t h e / u n t i m e l y / p a s t


the bibliography project


michel foucault

last modified: 19 February 2000

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Adamowski, T., "Sex in the Head." Canadian Forum 59 (1979), 40-42.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Aladjem, Terry K., "The Philosopher's Prism: Foucault, Feminism, and Critique." Political Theory 19 (May 1991), 277-291.

Albury, W. R. and D. R. Oldroyd, "From Renaissance Mineral Studies to Historical Geology, in the Light of Michel Foucault's The Order of Things." British Journal of Historical Science 10 (1977), 187-215.

Allen, Barry, "Government in Foucault." Canadian Journal of Philosophy 21 (December 1991), 321-440.

Allen, Robert van Roden, "Discourse and Sexuality: Toward the Texture of Eros." Semiotext(e) 4:1 (1981), 249-258.

Amariglio, Jack L., "The Body, Economic Discourse, and Power: An Economist's Introduction to Foucault." History of Political Economy 20:4 (Winter 1988), 583-613.

Amato, J., Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 454 (March 1981), 239-241.

Amico, Robert, d', "Desire and the Commodity Form." Telos 35 (1978), 88-122.

Amico, Robert, d', Review of Telos 36 (1978), 169-183.

Amulree, Lord, "Evolution of the Clinic." Books and Bookman 19:4 (1974), 53.

Review of Birth of the Clinic, by Michel Foucault.

Anchor, Robert, "Michel Foucault: Subversions of the Subject." History and Theory 34:1 (1995), 122-132.

Review of Michel Foucault, by Philip Barker.

anon., Review of Death and the Labyrinth: The World of Raymond Roussel, Michel Foucault. London Review of Books 9:11 (15 October 1987).

anon., Review of The Foucault Reader, Paul Rabinow, Ed. Antioch Review 43 (Spring 1985), 253.

anon., Review of The Foucault Reader, Paul Rabinow, Ed. Social Forces 64 (December 1985), 548.

anon., Review of The Foucault Reader, Paul Rabinow, Ed. Times Educational Supplement (11 July 1986), 23.

anon., Review of The Foucault Reader, Paul Rabinow, Ed. Wilson Quarterly 9 (Summer 1985), 129-130.

Arac, Jonathan, "The Function of Foucault at the Present Time." Humanities in Society 3 (Winter 1980), 73-86.

Arac, Jonathan, Ed. After Foucault: Humanistic Knowledge, Postmodern Challenges. New Brunswick and London: Rutgers University Press, 1988.

"The essays in this collection assess the impact of Michel Foucault's work on the conditions of disciplinary knowledge in humanistic studies and speculate on the directions we might take from his work. They cover a wide range of fundamental concerns from philosophy of knowledge in both theoretical and applied forms, to philology, history, psychoanalysis, feminism, and politics. Whether the contributors would be counted as being 'for' or 'against' Foucault, all of them show that their understanding has been altered by the challenges his work has posed. In some cases Foucault's thought is severely criticized as an obstacle to effective understanding or action; in others, his thought offers a resource through which received opinion can be displaced.

"Much has been published on Foucault, but this collection stands out from the others. The essays are both less expository and less general; the distinguished contributors move beyond particulars, and, as a group, shift discussion into areas Foucault himself did not address. The result is a lively debate and further probing beyond disciplinary boundaries. After Foucault will interest political theorists, feminists, and scholars of history, philosophy, and literature." from the back cover

Includes: Jonathan Arac, "Introduction"; Edward W. Said, "Michel Foucault, 1926-1984"; David Cousens Hoy, "Foucault: Modern or Postmodern?"; Paul A. Bove, "The Rationality of Disciplines: The Abstract Understanding of Stephen Toulmin"; Daniel T. O'Hara, "What Was Foucault"; Marie-Rose Logan, "The Renaissance: Foucault's Lost Chance?"; H. D. Harootunian, "Foucault, Genealogy, History: The Pursuit of Otherness"; Isaac D. Balbus, "Disciplining Women: Michel Foucault and the Power of Feminist Discourse"; Jana Sawacki, "Feminism and the Power of Foucaldian Discourse"; Sheldon S. Wolin, "On the Theory and Practice of Power."

To order the paperback edition of After Foucault : Humanistic Knowledge, Postmodern Challenges , go to:

Arac, Jonathan, "Foucault and Central Europe: A Polemical Speculation." boundary 2 21 (Fall 1994), 197-210.

Archambault, Paul J., "Michel Foucault's Last Discourse on Language." Papers on Language and Literature 21 (Fall 1985), 433-442.

Archard, David, "Forgetting Foucault: A Reply to Hugh Silverman's 'Michel Foucault's Nineteenth-Century System of Thought and the Archaeological Sleep.'" Seminar IV (1980), 8-15.

Arditi, Jorge, "The Feminization of Etiquette Literature: Foucault, Mechanisms of Social Change, and the Paradoxes of Empowerment." Sociological Perspectives 39 (Fall 1996), 417-434.

Armstrong, D., "The Subject and The Social in Medicine: An Appreciation of Michel Foucault." Sociology of Health and Illness 7:1 (1985), 108-117.

Discusses The Birth of the Clinic, Discipline and Punish, and The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Armstrong, Timothy J., Ed. Michel Foucault, Philosopher. New York: Routledge, 1992.

"Michel Foucault Philosopher brings together original essays by an outstanding group of international scholars who present an array of critical readings of Foucault's work and its impact on western thought. The book stems from the most important colloquium on Foucault to take place (Paris, January 1988) since his death in 1984.

"The volume aims to compass the whole range of Foucault's contribution, while looking to the central topics which give his work its uniqueness. A special effort is made to come to terms with the major shifts in Foucault's thought in the last two volumes of the History of Sexuality and this to account for the whole itinerary his work has followed -- this volume treats such topics as Foucault's place in the history of philosophy; including his relationship to psychoanalysis and Marxism; style and discourse; power and government; ethics and the constitution of the self; and history and rationality.

Includes: Part 1. Michel Foucault in the History of Philosophy. Roberto Machado, "Archaeology and Epistemology"; Gerard Lebrun, "Notes on Phenomenology in Les Mots et les Choses; Etienne Balibar, "Foucault and Marx: The Question of Nominalism"; Jacques-Alain Miller, "Michel Foucault and Psychoanalysis"; Francois Wahl, "Inside or Outside Philosophy?"; Hubert L. Dreyfus, "On the Ordering of Things: Being and Power in Heidegger and Foucault." Part 2. Style and Discourse. Manfred Frank, "On Foucault's Concept of Discourse"; Miguel Morey, "On Michel Foucault's Philosophical Style: Towards a Critique of the Normal"; Denis Hollier, "The Word of God: 'I Am God'"; Walter Seiter, "Oneirocriticisms"; Raymond Bellour, "Towards Fiction". Part 3. Power and Government. Gilles Deleuze, "What is a dispositif?"; Francois Ewald, "A Power Without an Exterior"; Pierre Macherey, "Towards a Natural History of Norms"; Blandine Barret-Kriegel, "Michel Foucault and the Police State"; Michael Donnelly, "On Foucault's Uses of the Notion 'Biopower'"; Alessandro Pizzorno, "Foucault and the Liberal View of the Individual". Part 4. Ethics and the Subject. John Rajchman, "Foucault: The Ethic and the Work"; Pierre Hadot, "Reflections on the Notion of 'The Cultivation of the Self"; Christian Jambet, "The Constitution of the Subject of Spiritual Practice"; Rainer Rochlitz, "The Aesthetics of Existence: Post-conventional Morality and the Theory of Power in Michel Foucault"; James W. Bernauer, "Beyond Life and Death: On Foucault's Post-Auschwitz Ethic." Part 5. Rationalities and Histories. Dominique Janicaud, "Rationality, Force and Power: Foucault and Habermas's Criticisms"; Mark Poster, "Foucault, the Present and History"; Christian Bouchindhomme, "Foucault, Morality and Criticism"; Richard Rorty, "Moral Identity and Private Autonomy"; Andre Glucksmann, "Michel Foucault's Nihilism"; Paul Veyne, "Foucault and Going Beyond (Or the Fulfillment of) Nihilism.

To order the hardcover edition of Michel Foucault Philosopher, go to:
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Aron, Harry, "Wittgenstein's Impact on Foucault." Wittgenstein and His Impact on Contemporary Thought. Proceedings of the Second International Wittgenstein Symposium, 29 August to 4 September 1977. Vienna: Holder, Pichler, Tempsky, 1978. pp. 58-60.

Aronowitz, Stanley, "History as Disruption: On Benjamin and Foucault." Humanities in Society 2 (Spring 1979), 125-147.

Aronson, Alfred Lars, "Medicine: History and Theory." Yale Review 63 (1974), 473-476.

Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault.

Ashenden, Samantha, and David Owen Foucault contra Habermas: Recasting the Dialogue Between Genealogy and Critical Theory. Sage Publications, 1999.

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Atterton, Peter, "Power's Blind Struggle for Existence: Foucault, Genealogy and Darwinism." History of the Human Sciences 7:4 (November 1994), 1-20.

Ball, Stephen, Ed. Foucault and Education: Disciplines and Knowledge. London and New York: Routledge, 1991.

Barham, P., Review of Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault. Sociology 13 (1979), 111-115.

Barker, Philip. Michel Foucault: Subversions of the Subject. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1993.

To order the hardcover edition of Michel Foucault: Subversions of the Subject, go to:

Barry, Andrew, Thomas Osborne, and Nikolas Rose, Eds. Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism, and Rationalities of Government. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.

"Despite the enormous influence of Michel Foucault in gender studies, social theory, and cultural studies, his work has been relatively neglected in the study of politics. Although he never published a book on the state, in the late 1970s Foucault examined the technologies of power used to regulate a society and the ingenious recasting of power and agency that he saw as both consequence and condition of their operation.

"These twelve essays provide a critical introduction to Foucault's work on politics, exploring its relevance to past and current thinking about liberal and neo-liberal forms of government. Moving away from the great texts of liberal political philosophy, this book looks closely at the technical means with which the ideals of liberal political rationalities have been put into practice in such areas as schools, welfare, and the insurance industry.

"This fresh approach to one of the seminal thinkers of the twentieth century is essential reading for anyone interested in social and cultural theory, sociology, and politics." from the University of Chicago Press online catalog

Includes: Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne, and Nikolas Rose, "Introduction"; Graham Burchell, "Liberal Government and Techniques of the Self"; Nikolas Rose, "Governing 'Advanced' Liberal Democracies"; Barry Hindess, "Liberalism, Socialism and Democracy: Variations on a Governmental Theme"; Vikki Bell, "The Promise of Liberalism and the Performance of Freedom"; Thomas Osborne, "Security and Vitality: Drains, Liberalism and Power in the Nineteenth Century"; Andrew Barry, "Lines of Communication and Spaces of Rule"; Ian Hunter, "Assembling the School"; Alan Hunt, "Governing the City: Liberalism and Early Modern Modes of Governance"; Pat O'Malley, "Risk and Responsibility"; Mitchell Dean, "Foucault, Government and the Enfolding of Authority"; Barbara Cruikshank, "Revolutions Within: Self-Government and Self-Esteem"; Colin Gordon, "Foucault in Britain."

To order the hardcover edition of Foucault and Political Reason, go to:
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Batkin, Norton, "Conceptualizing the History of Contemporary Museum: On Foucault and Benjamin." Dialogue and Universalism 6:3 (1996), 43-

Baudrillard, Jean, "Forgetting Foucault." Translated by Nicole Dufresne. Humanities in Society 3 (Winter 1980), 87-111.

Bell, David F., "Foucault, Conventions, and New Historicism." In Signs of Change State University of New York Press, 1996. pp. 297-308.

Bell, J. A., Review of The Lives of Michel Foucault, by David Macey. Choice 31 (June 1994), 1596

Bell, Vikki. Interrogating Incest: Feminism, Foucault and the Law. London and New York: Routledge, 1993. Sociology of Law and Crime series.

"Within feminism incest has often been subsumed under a discussion of sexual violence and abuse. Yet, important as this is, there has been little account of how feminist work itself relates to other ways of talking about and understanding incest. In Interrogating Incest Vikki Bell focuses on the issue of incest and its place in sociological theory, feminist theory and criminal law. By examining incest from a critical Foucauldian framework she considers how feminist discourse on incest itself fits into existing ways of talking about sex. Closely surveying the historical background to incest legislation and the theoretical issues involve, Vikki Bell delineates their practical implications and shows what uncomfortable questions and important dilemmas are raised by the criminalisation of incest." from the Routledge on-line catalog

Bell, Vicki, "Dreaming and Time in Foucault's Philosophy." Theory, Culture, and Society 11 (1994), 151-163.

Ben-Menahem, Yemima, "Michel Foucault: History as Therapy." Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought 19:4 (1996), 579-

Beniger, James R., Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. Communication Research 20 (February 1993), 146-147.

Bennett, Jane. Unthinking Faith and Enlightenment: Nature and the State in a Post-Hegelian Era. New York and London: New York University Press, 1987.

"Is contemporary political thought caught in a trap? Hegel discovered an impasse between 'Faith' and 'Enlightenment' which only his dialectic could transcend. With the failure of his solution in the background, Unthinking Faith and Enlightenment explores the boundaries of contemporary debates, one side exaggerates the possibility of harmony between humans and the natural and social worlds, while the other insists upon the possibility of human mastery.

"Drawing critically upon the work of Michel Foucault and Charles Taylor, the work attempts to unthink these particular terms of debate between Faith on the one hand and Enlightenment on the other. It is an orientation to nature and politics that acknowledges 'otherness' but resists the Promethean urge." from the dust jacket

Bennett, Jane, "'How Is It, Then, That We Still Remain Barbarians?'" Foucault, Schiller, and the Aestheticization of Ethics." Political Theory 24 (November 1996), 653-772.

Bennington, Geoff P., "Cogito Incognito: Foucault's 'My Body, This Paper, This Fire." Oxford Literary Review 4 (1979), 5-8.

Berman, Paul, Review of The Lives of Michel Foucault, by David Macey. New Republic 210 (27 June 1994), 39

Bernauer, James, "The Sounds of Silence." Commonweal 113 (17 January 1986), 17-20.

Bernauer, James, "The Prisons of Man: An Introduction to Foucault's Negative Theology." International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (December 1987), 365-380.

Bernauer, James W., "Beyond Life and Death: On Foucault's Post-Auschwitz Ethic." Philosophy Today 32 (Summer 1988), 128-142.

Bernauer, James W. Michel Foucault's Force of Flight: Towards an Ethics for Thought. Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press, 1990. Contemporary Studies in Philosophy and Human Studies.

"No philosophical thinker possessed the late Michel Foucault's (1926-1984) acute ability to discover and describe the confinements that imprison contemporary life and thought. His critics often accused Foucault not only of identifying prisons but of celebrating them, of creating such a sense of entrapment within systems of ideas and practices that little scope was left for personal freedom and cultural change. Michel Foucault's Force of Flight argues against this common view of Foucault. This study offers a comprehensive chronological reading of Foucault's published, and many unpublished, writings and claims that Foucault's achievement was to have fashioned a series of inquiries that makes it possible to question the activity of thought itself as an ethical practice. Foucault appreciated that the options for our current thought and action had become hostages to our modern knowledges. Bernauer shows that, for Foucault, a successful political challenge to those knowledges demanded a new moral relationship to them, a relationship that is founded upon his ethics of thought." from the back cover

To order the paperback edition of Michel Foucault's Force of Flight, go to:

Bernauer, James W., Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. America 116 (16 May 1992), 441

Bernauer, James, and David Rasmussen, Eds. The Final Foucault. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1988.

"Michel Foucault left a rich legacy of ideas and approaches, many of which still await exposition and analysis. The Final Foucault is devoted to his last published (and some as yet unpublished) work and includes a translation of one of his last interview, a comprehensive bibliography of his publications, and a biographical chrnology.

"Foucault was still working on his history of sexuality when he died in 1984, but his main concern remained, as throughout his career, a deeper understanding of the nature of truth. His final set of lecture at the College de France, described here by Thomas Flynn, focused on the concept of truth-telling as a moral virture in the ancient world.

"In the other essays, Karlis Racevskis examines the questions of identity at the core of Foucault's work; Garth Gillian takes up the problems inherent in any attempt to characterize Foucault's philosophy; James Bernauer explores the ethical basis of Foucault's philosopy and offers a context for understanding his late interest in the Christian experience; and Diane Rubenstein offers a Lacanian interpretation of the last work."

Includes: Michel Foucault, "The Ethic of Care for the Self as a Practice of Freedom: An Interview." Translated by J. D. Gauthier.; Karlis Racevskis, "Michel Foucault, Rameau's Nephew, and the Question of Identity"; Garth Gillian, "Foucault's Philosophy"; James Bernauer, "Michel Foucault's Ecstatic Thinking"; Diane Rubenstein, "Food for Thought: Metonymy in the Late Foucault"; Thomas Flynn, "Foucault as Parrhesiast: His Last Course at the College de France (1984)"; James Bernauer and Thomas Keenan, "The Works of Michel Foucault, 1954-1984"; Michel Foucault: A Biographical Chronology.

To order the paperback edition of The Final Foucault, go to:

Bernstein, M. A., "Street-Foucault." University Publishing 13 (Summer 1984),

Bersani, Leo, "The Subject of Power." diacritics 7 (1977), 2-21.

Discusses Discipline and Punish.

Bersani, Leo, Pedagogy and Pederasty" in Richard Poirier, Ed. Raritan Reading New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Pres, 1990. pp. 1-7.

Bersani, Leo, "Foucault, Freud, Fantasy, and Power." GLQ 2:1/2 (1995), 11-33.

Best, Steven. The Politics of Historical Vision: Marx, Foucault, Habermas. New York: Guilford Press, 1995. Critical Perspectives.

"Providing an important contribution to current controversies regarding history, social theory, politics, and the Foucault-Habermas debate, this work offers a detailed comparison of the historical visions of both Foucault and Habermas, using Marx as a modernist contrast. The book clearly illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of each thinker's ideas for the productive analysis of history and society, relating the work of each to current debates over modern and postmodern theory." from the back cover

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Bevir, Mark, "Foucault and Critique: Deploying Agency against Autonomy." Political Studies 47:1 (1999), 65-

Bevir, Mark, "Foucault, Power, and Institutions." Political Studies 47:2 (1999), 345-

Bevis, Phil, Michele Cohen and Gavin Kendall, "Archaeologizing Genealogy: Michel Foucault and the Economy of Austerity." Economy and Society 18:3 (August 1989), 323-345.

"Abstract: Analysing the development and transformation of Michel Foucault's Histoire de la sexualite project, we find a pivotal series of 'monolithic' conceptions, organized around the archaeus of an 'austere economy'. We argue that theree series of 'gaps' condition the particularities of the texts: Foucault's decisions are related strategically to psychoanalysis as a technology of the self."

Biesta, Gert J. J., "Pedagogy Without Humanism: Foucault and teh Subject of Education." Interchange 29:1 (1998), 1-

Birken, Lawrence, "Developmentalism and Its Discontents: From Darwin to Foucault and Wallerstein." Annals of Scholarship 6: 2-3 (1989)

Birken, Lawrence, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Telos 81 (Fall 1989), 162-171.

Blades, David W. Procedures of Power and Curriculum Change: Foucault and the Quest for Possibilities in Science Education. Peter Lang Publishing, 1997. Counterpoints, vol. 35.

"Is curriculum change possible? Procedures of Power and Curriculum Change provides a provocative new response to this question. Through a case study of a recent major attempt to change high school science, this work reveals the continuing barrenness of modernistic explanations of curriculum change. Revisiting this case study in the light of Foucault's concept of power suggests that curriculum change is not an issue of correct technique but a journey of being. An imaginative waving of narratives, metaphors and allegory invites readers to join this journey by entering into a postmodern conversation about the possibilitites for curriculum change." from the Peter Lang on-line catalog

To order the paperback edition of Procedures of Power and Curriculum Change, go to:

Blair, Carole, Review of Michel Foucault, by Charles C. Lemert and Garth Gillian, and Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. Quarterly Journal of Speech 70 (February 1984), 100-103.

Blair, Carole, and Martha Cooper, "The Humanist Turn in Foucault's Rhetoric of Inquiry." Quarterly Journal of Speech 73 (May 1987), 151-171.

Blair, Carole, "Symbolic Action and Discourse: The Convergent/Divergent Views of Kenneth Burke and Michel Foucault." In Kenneth Burke and Contemporary European Thought: Rhetoric in Transition. Bernard L. Brock, Ed. University of Alabama Press, 1995. pp. 119-165.

Blake, Nancy, "Psychoanalysis and Femininity." Structuralist Review 1:2 (1978), 90-96.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Blasius, Mark, Review of Saint Foucault, David M. Halperin Contemporary Sociology 533-534.

Bogard, William, "Discipline and Deterrence: Rethinking Foucault on the Question of Power in Contemporary Society." Social Science Journal 28:3 (July 1991), 325-346.

Bordo, S., Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Cross Currents 30 (1980), 194-197.

Bossy, John, Review of The Order of Things, Michel Foucault. New Statesman (4 June 1971), 775.

Boswell, John, Review of Foucault, David Couzens Hoy, Ed. New York Times Book Review (31 January 1987), 31

Bounds, Elizabeth, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Union Seminary Quarterly Review 41: 3/4 (1987), 107-113.

Bove, Paul A., "The End of Humanism: Michel Foucault and the Power of Disciplines." Humanities in Society 3 (Winter 1980), 23-40.

Bove, Paul A., "Mendacious Innocents, or, the Modern Genealogist as Conscientious Intellectual: Nietzsche, Foucault, Said." boundary 2 9:3/10:1 (1981), 359-388.

Reprinted in Daniel O'Hara, Ed., Why Nietzsche Now? Bloomington: Indiana Univeristy Press, 1985; pp. 359-388.

Bove, Paul A., "Intellectuals at War: Michel Foucault and the Analytics of Power." SubStance 37-38 (1982), 36-55.

Bove, Paul A., "Madness, Medicine, and the State." In Mastering Discourse: The Politics of Intellectual Culture. Duke University Press, 1992. pp. 215-229.

Bowen, John, Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. Sociological Review 38 (May 1990), 364-366.

Boyne, Roy. Foucault and Derrida: The Other Side of Reason. London and New York: Routledge, 1990.

"The writings of Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida pose a serious challenge to the old established, but now seriously compromised forms of thought. In this compelling book, Roy Boyne explains the very significant advances for which they have been responsible, their general importance for the human sciences, and the forms of hope that they offer for an age often characterized by scepticism, cynicism and reaction. The focus of the book is the dispute between Foucault and Derrida on the nature of reason, madness and 'otherness'. The range of issues covered includes the birth of the prison, problems of textual interpretation, the nature of the self and contemporary movements such as socialism, feminism and anti-racialism. Roy Boyne argues that whilst the two thinkers chose very different paths, they were in fact rather surprisingly to converge upon the common ground of power and ethics. from the Routledge online catalog

To order the paperback edition of Foucault and Derrida: The Other Side of Reason, go to:

Brain, D., Review of The Archaeology of Knowledge, Michel Foucault. Contemporary Sociology 19:6 (November 1990), 902-906.

Braybrooke, David, Review of Michel Foucault, by David R. Shumway. Dalhousie Review 69 (Summer 1989), 292-293.

Breuer, Stefan, "Foucault and Beyond: Towards a Theory of the Disciplinary Society." International Social Science Journal 41 (May 1989), 235-247.

Bright, Martin, Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. New Statesman and Society 5 (21 August 1992), 37-38.

Brodeur, Jean-Paul, "McDonell on Foucault: Supplementary Remarks." Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (1977), 555-568.

Brown, B., and M. Cousins, "The Linguistic Fault: The Case of Foucault's Archaeology." Economy and Society 9:3 (August 1980), 251-278.

"Abstract: It is argued that the concept of discursive formation presented by Foucault provides the means whereby conventional treatments of 'discourse' can be criticized. These would include historical, linguistic and epistemological forms of investigation. But it is also argued that Foucault does not sufficiently displace linguistic categories. As a result his account of the theoretical probems of 'conditions of existence' of discourses cannot be sustained."

Brown, P. L., "Epistemology and Method: Althusser, Foucault, Derrida." Cultural Hermeneutics 3:2 (1975), 147-163.

Bruzina, Ron, "Comments on "On the Ordering of Things: Being and Power in Heidegger and Foucault." Southern Journal of Philosophy 28: supplement (1989)

See also: Hubert L. Dreyfus, "On the Ordering of Things."

Buker, Eloise A., "Hidden Desires and Missing Persons: A Feminist Deconstruction of Foucault." Western Political Quarterly 43 (December 1990), 811-832.

Bullough, Vern L., Review of Histoire de la sexualite, Vol. 2, L'usage des plaisirs, and Vol. 3, Le souci de soi, by Miche Foucault. American Historical Review 90 (April 1985), 387-388.

Bunn, James, Review of Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault. Structuralist Review 1:3 (Summer 1979), 84-91.

Burchell, Graham The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality, with Two Lectures by and an Interview with Michel Foucault. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991.

"Based on Michel Foucault's 1978 and 1979 lectures at the College de Foucault on governmental rationalities and his 1977 interview regarding his work on imprisonment, this volume is the long-awaited sequel to Power/Knowledge. In these lectures, Foucault examines the art or activity of government both in its present form and within a historical perspective, as well as the different ways governmentality has been made thinkable and practicable.

"Foucault's thoughts on political discourse and governmentality are supplemented by the essays of internationally renowned scholars. United by the common influence of Foucault's approach, they explore the many modern manifestations of government, the reason of state, police, liberalism, security, social economy, insurance, solidarity, welfare, risk management, and more. The central theme is that the object and the activity of government are not instinctive and natural things, but things that have been invented and learned.

The Foucault Effect analyzes the thought behind practices of government and argues that criticism represents a true force for change in attitudes and actions, and that extending the limits of some practices allows the invention of others. This unique and extraordinarily useful collection of articles and primary materials will open the way for a whole new set of discussions of the work of Michel Foucault as well as the status of liberalism, social policy, and insurance." from the back cover

Includes: Colin Gordon, "Governmental Rationality: An Introduction"; Michel Foucault, "Politics and the Study of Discourse"; Michel Foucault, "Questions of Method"; Michel Foucault, "Governmentality"; Pasquale Pasquino, "Theatrum Politicum: The Genealogy of Capital - Police and the State of Prosperity"; Graham Burchell, "Peculiar Interests: Civil Society and Governing 'The System of Natural Liberty'"; Giovanna Procacci, "Social Economy and the Government of Poverty"; Jacques Donzelot, "The Mobilization of Society"; Ian Hacking, "How Should We Do the History of Statistics?"; "Francois Ewald, "Insurance and Risk"; Daniel Defert, "'Popular Life' and Insurance Technology"; Pasquale Pasquino, "Criminology: The Birth of a Special Knowledge" Jacques Donzelot, "Pleasure in Work"; Robert Castel, "From Dangerousness to Risk."

To order the paperback edition of The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality, go to:

Burke, Peter, "Liberator of the Past." History Today 35 (March 1985), 6-7.

Burke, Peter, Ed. Critical Essays on Michel Foucault. Aldershot, Hans., UK: Scolar Press, and Brookfield, VT: Ashgate Pub., 1992.

Burke, Sean. The Death and Return of the Author: Criticism and Subjectivity in Barthes, Foucault, and Derrida. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1992.

"In contemporary thought the death of the author has assumed a significance comparable only to the death of God in the nineteenth century, yet no clear statement of what is meant by this notion has emerged in critical theory. In this study Sean Burke provides not only the first detailed explanation of anti-authorialism, but also shows how -- even taken on its own terms -- the attempt to abolish the author is fundamentally misguided and philosophically untenable.

"Burke makes clear his admiration for the theorists he reads, but argues that authorship is a blind spot in their work. Rather than developing the customjary humanist defence, Burke out-theorizes theory through rigorous readings which demonstrate that the concept of the author remained profoundly active even as its disappearance was being articulated. In so doing, he effectively deconstructs deconstruction and proposes a revitalised conception of authorship for the modern era." from the back cover of the paperback edition

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Burnham, John C., Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disorders 143 (1966), 455-457.

Butler, Judith, "Foucault and the Paradox of Bodily Inscriptions." Journal of Philosophy 86:11 (November 1989), 601-607.

Cain, William E., Review of Ariel and the Police, by Frank Lentricchia. New England Quarterly 61 (December 1988), 615

Cameron, Averil, Review of Histoire de la sexualite, Vol. 2, L'usage of plaisirs, and Vol. 3, Le souci de soi, by Michel Foucault. Journal of Roman Studies 76 (1986), 266-271.

Canguilhem, Georges, "Report from Mr. Canguilhem on the Manuscript Filed by Mr. Michel Foucault, Direct of the Institut Francais of Hamberg, in order to Obtain Permission to Print His Principal Thesis for the Doctor of Letters." Translated by Ann Hobart and Arnold I. Davidson. Critical Inquiry 21 (Winter 1995), 275-281.

Canguilhem, Georges, "On Histoire de la folie as an Event." Translated as Ann Hobart. Critical Inquiry 21 (Winter 1995), 282-286.

Caputo, John D., and Mark Yount, Eds. Foucault and the Critique of Institutions. University Park: Pennsylvania State University, 1993. Studies of the Greater Philadelphia Philosophy Consortium.

"The issue of the institution is not addressed systematically anywhere in the literature on Foucault, although it is everywhere to be found in Foucault's writings. Foucault and the Critique of Institutions not only interprets the work of Foucault but also applies it to the question of the institution. Foucault is a master at analyzing the web of social relations ("power") that effectively shapes ("normalizes") the modern individual. While these social relations are smaller and finer than institutions, institutions are, by sustained account to follow up the implications of Foucault's provocative theses about power for the analysis of institutions.

"Foucault and the Critique of Institutions offers a set of preliminary essays that raises basic questions about the theoretical character of Foucault's thought and then several groups of other essays that go on to take up the practical issues raised by his work. Joseph Margolis and Jitendra Mohanty address one of the most complex problems posed by Foucault's texts: his status as a philosopher. Mark Poster explores the problem of the 'self' in Foucault, while Judith Butler focuses her searching investigation of the self on its gendered nature. Joseph Rouse examines the functioning of the natural sciences within the institutional setting of the university and the academic profession, while Chuck Dyke and Mary Schmelzer present vigourous critiques of the normalizing power of the university. Robert Moore and Mark Yount offer original studies of the implications of Foucault's work for the workplace, labor law, and affirmative action. Finally, John Caputo studies Foucault's famous history of madness and raises the question of the possibility of exercising a 'healling' and not merely a 'normalizing' power in the mental hospital and the church." from the back cover

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Carrette, Jeremy R. Foucault and Religion: Spiritual Corporality and Political Spirituality New York: Routledge, 1999.

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Carroll, David, "The Subject of Archaeology or the Sovereignty of the Episteme." Modern Language Notes 93 (1978), 695-722.

Carroll, David. Paraesthetics: Foucault, Lyotard, Derrida. New York: Routledge, 1987.

"'Paraesthetics' is a neologism invented by David Carroll to unlock the extra-aesthetic relationship between art and literature in the work of Michel Foucault, Jean-Francois Lyotard and Jacques Derrida." from the Routledge online catalog

Cartledge, Paul, "Getting/After Foucault: Two Postantiques Responses to Postmodern challenges." Gender & History 9:3 (19--)

Casey, Edward S., "The Place of Space in The Birth of the Clinic." Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (November 1987), 351-356.

Cavallari, Hector Mario, "Savoir and Pouvoir: Michel Foucault's Theory of Discursive Practice." Humanities in Society 3 (Winter 1980), 55-72.

Castellani, Brian, "Michel Foucault andSymbolic Interactionism: the Making of a New Theory of Interactionism." Studies in Symbolic Interaction 22 (1999), 247-

Cawley, R. McGreggor and William Chaloupka, "American Governmentality: Michel Foucault and Public Administration." American Behavioral Scientist 41:1 (September 1997), 28-

Caws, Peter, "Language as the Human Reality." New Republic (27 March 1971), 28.

Review of The Order of Things, Michel Foucault.

Caws, Peter, Review of The Archaeology of Knowledge, Michel Foucault. New York Times Book Review 22 October 1972, p. 6+.

Caws, Peter, "Medical Change." New Republic (10 November 1973), 28-30.

Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault.

Chambon, Adrienne S., Allan Irving, and Laura Epstein, Eds. Reading Foucault for Social Work. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.

"The first book length introduction to the work of Michel Foucault in the social work profession, this volume reveals how Foucault offers a relevant entry point for revisiting social work's mission, activities, and objectives. With discussions from various fields and levels of practice. Reading Foucault for Social Work includes conceptual, philosophical, and methodological considerations and a roundtable discussion with Foucault on social work. This book provides a critical reexamination of the profession's institutional arrangements and knowledge--helping us to envision alternative practicws and strategies for social change." from the back cover of the paperback edition

Contents: Adrienne S. Chambon and Allan Irving, "Introduction." Part One: Social Work in Perspective. 1. Laura Epstein, "The Culture of Social Work." 2. Allan Irving, "Waiting for Foucault: Social Work and the Multitudinous Truth(s) of Life." 3. Adrienne S. Chambon, "Foucault's Approach: Making the Familiar Visible." 4. Social Work, Social Control, and Normalization: Roundtable Discussion with Michel Foucault. Part Two: Social Work Practices and Knowledge Reconsidered. 5. Nigel Parton, "Reconfiguring Child Welfare Practices: Risk, Advanced Liberalism, and the Government of Freedom." 6. Carol-Anne O'Brien, "Contested Territory: Sexualities and Social Work." 7. Catherine E. Foote and Arthur W. Frank, "Foucault and Therapy: The Disciplining of Grief." 8. Frank T. Y. Wang, "Resistance and Old Age: The Subject Behind the American Seniors' Movement." 9. Ken Moffat, "Surveillance and Government of the Welfare Recipient." 10. John Devine, "Postmodernity, Ethnology, and Foucault." Adrienne S. Chambon and Allan Irving, "Conclusion: Issues to Look Forward to."

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Chatelet, Francois, "Recit." In Michel Foucault: Power, Truth, Strategy. Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp. 13-28.

"'Recit' first appeared in L'Arc 70: La crise dans la tete (1970), pp. 3-15. Translated by Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton.

Chomsky, Noam, and Michel Foucault, "Human Nature: Justice versus Power." In Reflexive Water: The Basic Concerns of Mankind. Fons Elders, Ed. London: Souvenir Press, 1974., 133-199.

Clark, Elizabeth A., "Foucault, the Fathers, and Sex." Journal of the American Academy of Religion 56 (Winter 1988), 619-641.

Clark, Michael, "Putting Humpty Together Again: Essays Toward Integrative Analysis." Poetics Today 3:1 (1982), 159-170.

Clark, Michael. Michel Foucault: An Annotated Bibliography. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1983. Garland Bibliographies of Modern Critics and Critical Schools series.

Clemons, Walter, "Men Behind Bars" Newsweek (9 January 1978), 45.

Clifford, Michael R., "Crossing (out) the Boundary: Foucault and Derrida on Transgressing Transgression." Philosophy Today 31 (Fall 1987), 223-233.

Close, Anthony, "Centering the De-Centerers: Foucault and Las Meninas." Philosophy and Literature 11:1 (April 1987), 21-36.

Cobb, Richard, "A Triple Murder." New Society (8 June 1978), 550-552.

Cohen, Richard A., "Merleau-Ponty, the Flesh and Foucault." Philosophy Today 28 (Winter 1984), 329-338.

Cohen, Stan, "Souls in Confinement." Times Higher Education Supplement (27 January 1978), 17.

Cohen, Stanley, "The Archaeology of Power." Contemporary Sociology 7 (1978), 566-568.

Discusses Discipline and Punish.

Colapietro, Vincent, "American Evasions of Foucault." Southern Journal of Philosophy , 36:3 (Fall 1998), 329-

Colburn, Kenneth, Jr., "Desire and Discourse in Foucault: The Sign of the Fig Leaf in Michelangelo's David." Human Studies 10:1 (1987), 61-79.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Colebrook, Claire, "Ethics, Positivity, and Gender: Goucault, Aristotle, and the Care of the Self." Philosophy Today 42:1/4 (Spring 1998), 40-

Coles, Romand, "Foucault's Dialogical Artistic Ethos." Theory, Culture & Society 8 (1991), 99-120.

Coles, Robert, "From Torture to Technology." New Yorker 54 (29 January 1979), 95-98.

Discusses Discipline and Punish.

Coles, Romand. Self/Power/Other: Political Theory and Dialogical Ethics. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1992.

To order the hardcover edition of Self/Power/Other: Political Theory and Dialogical Ethics, go to:

Collins, Stephen L., Review of The Lives of Michel Foucault, by David Macey, and The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller. American Historical Review 99 (April 1994), 507-510.

Colwell, C., "The Retreat of the Subject in the Late Foucault." Philosophy Today 38 (Spring 1994), 56-69.

Comfort, Alex, "Breakdown and Repair." Guardian (5 May 1967), 7.

Connolly, William E., " ." Political Theory 13 (August 1985), 265-285.

A rebuttal to Charles Taylor's critique of Foucault

Connolly, William E., "Beyond Good and Evil: The Ethical Sensibility of Michel Foucault." Political Theory 21 (August 1993), 365-389.

Cook, Deborah, "Nietzsche and Foucault on Ursprung and Genealogy." Clio 19:4 (Summer 1990), 299-309.

Cook, Deborah, "Umbrellas, Laundry Bills, and Resistance: The Place of Foucault's Interviews in His Corpus." Clio 21 (Winter 1992), 145-155.

Cook, Deborah. The Subject Finds a Voice: Foucault's Turn Toward Subjectivity. New York: P. Lang, 1993. Revisioning Philosophy, vol. 11.

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Cooper, Barry. Michel Foucault: An Introduction to the Study of His Thought. Edwin Mellen Press, 1982.

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Cooper, Davina, "Productive, Relational and Everywhere?: Conceptualising Power and Resistance within Foucauldian Feminism." Sociology 28 (May 1994), 435-454.

Corlett, William S., Jr., "Pocock, Foucault, Forces of Reassurance." Political Theory , 17 (February 1989), 77-100.

Cousins, Mark, and Athar Hussain. Michel Foucault St. Martin's Press, 1984. Theoretical Traditions in the Social Sciences.

Coveney, J., "The Government and Ethics of Health Promotion: The Importance of Michel Foucault." Health Education Research , 13:3 (1998), 459-

Cocks, Joan, "Complementarity or Contradiction." Intellectual History Newsletter , 20 (1998)

From a roundtable on "Foucault and Historical Materialism." See also the contributions by Joseph G. Fracchia and Martin Jay.

Cranston, Maurice, "Men and Ideas: Michel Foucault." Encounter , 30:6 (1968), 34-42.

Crossley, Nick. The Politics of Subjectivity: Between Foucault and Merleau-Ponty. Aldershot, UK, and Brookfield, VT: Avebury, 1994.

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Culler, Jonathan, Review of The Order of Things, Michel Foucault. Cambridge Review , (29 January 1971), 104-109.

Culler, Jonathan, "Language and Knowledge." Yale Review , 62 (1972), 290-296.

Discusses The Archaeology of Knowledge.

D'Agostino, Fred, "Two Conceptions of Autonomy." Economy and Society , 27:1 (February 1998), 28-49.

"Abstract: Classical liberal theory has worked with a rationalistic conception of autonomy. S/he behaves autonomously who behaves in accordance with reason. The prominence of this conception of autonomy has contributed to the exploitation, by liberal political practice, of discourses of expertise which work to heteronomize citizen's choices and actions. A pluralistic conception of autonomy is developed, based on insights of Stanley Benn, which may provide a bulwark against he exploitation of citizens by experts. Some conditions for the protection of pluralistic autonomy are identified."

D'Amico, Robert, Review of Discipline and Punish, and The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Telos 36 (1978), 169-183.

Darier, Eric, Review of The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller. Canadian Journal of Political Science 26 (September 1993), 614-616.

Darier, Eric, Review of Michel Foucault, by Lawrence Olivier. Canadian Journal of Political Science 29 (March 1996), 182-184.

Davidson, Arnold I., Ed. Foucault and His Interlocutors Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.

"Beginning with the debate between Michel Foucault and Noam Chomsky on epistemology and politics, this book includes the most significant essays by the most important French thinkers who influenced and were influenced by Foucault. Foucault's teachers, colleagues, and collaborators take up his major claims, from his first to final works, and provide us with the authoritative context in which to understand Foucault's writings.

"This volume also includes several important works by Foucault proviously unpublished in English. The other contributors are Georges Canguilhem, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, Pierre Hadot, Michel Serres, and Paul Veyne."

"Here for the first time is the French Foucault." from the University of Chicago Press catalog

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Davis, Erik, Review of Foucault, by Gilles Deleuze. Voice Literary Supplement 72 (March 1989), 19.

Dean, Carolyn J., "The Productive Hypothesis: Foucault, Gender, and the History of Sexuality." History and Theory 33:3 (1994), 271-296.

Reprinted in History and: Histories Within the Human Sciences (University Press of Virginia, 1995), pp. 146-178.

Dean, Mitchell. Critical and Effective Histories: Foucault's Methods and Historical Sociology. New York: Routledge, 1994.

"This book places Foucault's methodologies against central currents in social theory and philosophy to provide a guide to doing historical sociology while charting an original position on the condition of social science today. It is addressed to those working at the cutting edge of social research and to those who wish to understand Foucault's legacy." from the back cover

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Dean, Mitchell, "Putting the Technological into Government" History of the Human Sciences 9 (August 1996), 47-68.

De Courtivron, Isabelle, "The Body Was His Battleground." New York Times Book Review (10 January 1993), 1+.

Delaporte, Francois, "Foucault, Epistemology and History." Economy and Society 27:2-3 (May 1998), 285-297.

"Abstract: This paper explores the way in which Michel Foucault utilized, re-worked and applied, in the field of the analysis of epistemological transformations, certain concepts from the history of the sciences that had been deployed by Bachelard and Canguilhem. More particularly, the paper focuses attention, on the one hand, upon the distinction between the present and thr actual, from which derives the question of 'recurrence', and, on the other, on the idea of games of the true and the false."

Deledalle, Gerard, Review of The Archaeology of Knowledge, Michel Foucault. Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (1972), 495-502.

Deleuze, Gilles. Foucault Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1986. Translated by Sean Hand.

"Since the completion of The History of Madness in 1960, Michel Foucault has been an important figure in the Western intellectual traditon. He was instrumental in making institutions -- in both the literal and the abstract sense -- the objects of scholarly research. The significance of Foucault's work has generated many studies, but this analysis by Gilles Deleuze is the first by a major philosopher working within the same poststructuralist tradition. Published in France in 1986 and now in its first English translation, Deleuze's work is distinguished by its focus on the conceptual underpinnings of Foucault's extensive writings." from the back cover

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Derbyshire, Philip, Ed. In Foucault's Wake: Essays on Power, Resistance and Subjectivity. Lawrence and Wishart, 1997.

Derrida, Jacques, "'To Do Justice to Freud': The History of Madness in the Age of Psychoanalysis." Translated by Anne Pascale Brault and Michael Naas. Critical Inquiry 20 (Winter 1994), 227-266.

Dervin, Daniel, Foucault's Preemption of Freud's Sexual Discourse and A Return to the Repressed." In Enactments Fairleigh Dickinson University Press / Associated University Presses, 1996. pp. 213-222.

Deveaux, Monique, "Feminism and Empowerment: A Critical Reading of Foucault." Feminist Studies 20 (Summer 1994), 223-247.

Dews, Peter, "The Nouvelle Philosophie and Foucault." Economy and Society 8:2 (May 1979), 127-171.

"Abstract: The first part of the paper gives an account of some of the intellectual and political background to the characteristic positions of the Nouvelle Philosophie, and details the presentation of these positions in the work of Andre Glucksmann. The important influence of Foucault on the Nouvelle Philosophie is then discussed. Foucault's interpretation of his own earlier work and his present manner of posing the question of power are critically analysed, and found to be defective in a way which allow room for the exploitation of his results by the Nouvelle Philosophie. This partial convergence is illustrated by a comparison between Lardreau and Jambet's L'Ange and Foucault's recent discussion of sexuality. The paper concludes with a brief location of the Nouvelle Philosophie in the context of intellectual developments outside France."

Dews, Peter, "Power and Subjectivity in Foucault." New Left Review 144 (1984)

Di Piero, W., Review of Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault. Commonweal 105 (12 May 1978), 313-315.

Donato, Eugenio, "Structuralism: The Aftermath." Sub-Stance 7 (1973), 9-26.

Donnelly, Michael, "Foucault's Genealogy of the Human Sciences." Economy and Society 11:4 (November 1982), 363-380.

Donnelly, Michael, Review of Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. American Journal of Sociology 90 (November 1984), 660-663.

Donoghue, Denis, Review of Ariel and the Police, by Frank Lentricchia. Times Literary Supplement (16 December 1988), 1399

Dreyfus, Hubert L., "Foucault's Critique of Psychiatric Medicine." Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (November 1987), 311-333.

Dreyfus, Hubert L., "On the Ordering of Things: Being and Power in Heidegger and Foucault." Southern Journal of Philosophy 28: supplement (1989)

See also: Ron Bruzina, "Comments on 'On the Ordering of Things: Being and Power in Heidegger and Foucault.'"

Driver, F., "Power, Space and the Body: A Critical Assessment of Foucault." Environment and Planning D 3:4 (1985), 425-446.

Discusses Discipline and Punish.

Dumm, Thomas L., "The Politics of Post-modern Aesthetics: Habermas contra Foucault." Political Theory 16 (May 1988), 209-228.

Dumm, Thomas L., Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. Sociology 23 (August 1989), 495-496.

Dumm, Thomas L. Michel Foucault and the Politics of Freedom Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1996. Modernity and Political Thought, vol. 9.

"Among the hundreds of books and articles on Foucault, only a handful make genuinely rewarding reading. Thomas L. Dumm's Michel Foucault and the Politics of Freedom is a welcome addition to that handful, for it treats Foucault with the subtlety his thought deserves and demands but almost never receives. As Dumm shows, appreciating Foucault's accomplishments as a political theorist requires sustained attention to the difficult balancing act to which he devoted himself: on the one hand Foucault's analyses, cool and impassioned at once, of the macabre inventiveness of power in our era, on the other, his likewise passionate and realistic imagination and appraisal of the resources our era offers for freedom, emancipation, liberation. Most interpretations of Foucault suffer from emphasizing one of these twinned concerns at the expense of the other. Dumm, by masterfully giving each its due, takes the measure of Foucault's original, provocative, unforgettable understanding of power and freedom. ... This is a book that will enlighten those coming to Foucault for the first time, and provoke many who think they know his work well to read it again." Frederick M. Dolan from the back cover

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Dumont, Matthew P., "What is Madness?" Social Science and Medicine 2 (1968), 502-504.

During, Lisabeth, Clues and Intimations: Freud, Holmes, Foucault." Cultural Critique 36 (Spring 1997), 29-

During, Simon. Foucault and Literature: Towards a Genealogy of Writing. London and New York: Routledge, 1992.

"The writings of the French historian, literary critic and philosopher Michel Foucault have been of immense importance to developments in literary studies since the late 1970s. He, more than anyone, stands behind the 'new historicism' and 'cultural materialism' that currently dominate international literary studies. Simon During provides a detailed introduction to the whole body of Foucault's work, with a particular emphasis on his literary theory. His study takes in Foucault's early studies of 'transgressive' writing from Sade and Artaud to the French 'new novelists' of the 1960s, and his later concern with the genealogy of the author/intellectual, writing and theorizing within specific, historical mechanisms of social control and production. Foucault and Literature offers a critique of Foucault and of the literary studies that have been influenced by him, and goes on to develop new methods of post-Foucauldian literary/cultural analysis." from the back cover

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Dutton, Michael, "Disciplinary Projects and Carceral Spread: Foucauldian Theory and Chinese Practice." Economy and Society 21:3 (August 1992), 276-294.

"Abstract: This paper has a dual object:

"First, utilizing Foucault's definition of 'disciplinary power', the paper demonstrates the disciplinary nature of China's reform through labour (laogai) system. It is suggested that laogai is an extension, deepening and modification of certain nineteenth-century Western utilitarian penal themes designed to 'reform the criminal mind' and produce 'obedient subjects'.

"Second, having established the disciplinary nature of the laogai project, the paper then goes on to examine the (neo-Foucauldian) 'disciplinary dispersal thesis'. This thesis suggests a gradual spread of carceral technologies which led to the formation of a disciplinary society . This paper suggest that there are a number of theoretical problems in this thesis, not the least of which is its rather ambiguous relationship to the work of Foucault."

Earle, William, "Foucault's The Use of Pleasure as Philosophy." Metaphilosophy 20 (April 1989), 169-177.

Eco, Umberto, "Language, Power, Force" in Umberto Eco, Travels in Hyperreality: Essays New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1986. pp. 239-255.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment and The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Eisenach, E. J., Review of Self/Power/Other, by Romand Coles. Choice 30 (March 1993), 1240

Elders, Fons, "Postscript." In Reflexive Water: The Basic Concerns of Mankind. Fons Elders, Ed. London: Souvenir Press, 1974. pp. 268-302.

Emad, P., "Foucault and Biemel on Representation: A Beginning Inquiry." Man and World 12:3 (1979), 284-297.

Engelstein, Laura, "Combined Underdevelopment: Discipline and the Law in Imperial and Soviet Russia." American Historical Review 98 (April 1993), 338-381.

Eribon, Didier. Michel Foucault. Translated by Betsy Wing. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.

"At the time of his death in 1984, at the age of fifty-eight, Michel Foucault was widely regarded as one of the most powerful minds of this century. Hailed by distinguished historians and lionized on his frequent visits to America, he continues to provoke lively debate. The nature and merits of his accomplishments remain tangled in controversy. Rejecting traditional liberal and Marxist 'dreams of solidarity,' Foucault became the very model of the modern intellectual, replacing Sartre as the figure of the eminent Parisian and cosmopolitan master thinker.

"Foucault himself discouraged biographical questions, claiming that he was 'not at all interesting.' Didier Eribon's captivating account overthrows that assertion. As a journalist well acquainted with Foucault for years before his death Foucault for years before his death, Eribon was particularly well placed to conduct the dozens of interviews which are the cornerstone of this book. He has drawn upon eyewitness accounts by Foucault's closest associates from all phases of his life -- his mother, his schoolteachers, his classmates, his friends and enemies in academic life, and his celebrated companions in political activism, including Simone Signoret and Yves Montand, Eribon has methodically retraced the footsteps of his peripatetic subject, from France to Sweden to Poland to Germany to Tunisia to Brazil to Japan to the United States. The result is a concise, crisply readable, meticulously documented narrative that debunks the many myths and rumors surrounding the brilliant philosopher -- and forces us to consider seriously the idea that all his books are indeed, just as Foucault said near the end of his life, 'fragments of an autobiography.'

"Who was this man, Michel Foucault? In the late 1950s Foucault emerged as a budding young cultural attache, friendly with Gaullist diplomats. By the mid-1960s he appeared as one of the avatars of structuralism, positioning himself as a new star in the fashionable world of French thought. A few months after the May 1968 student revolt, with Gaullism apparently shaken, he emerged as an ultra-leftist and a fellow traveler of Maoists. Yet during this same period, Eribon shows, he was quietly and adroitly campaigning for a chair in the College de France -- the very pinnacle of the French academic sytem.

"This book does more than follow the career of one extraordinary intellectual. It reconstructs the cultural, political, and intellectual life of France from the postwar years to the present. It is the story of a man and his time." from the dust jacket

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Eskes, Tina B., Margaret Carlisle, and Eleanor M. Miller, "The Discourse of Empowerment: Foucault, Marcuse, and Women's Fitness." Journal of Sport and Social Issues , 2:3 (1998), 317-

Ewald, Francois, "Foucault and the Contemporary Scene." Philosophy and Criticism 25:3 (1999), 81-

Falzon, Christopher. Foucault and Social Dialogue: Beyond Fragmentation. New York: Routledge, 1998.

"In the wake of the 'death of the subject', contemporary ethical and political debate has been polarised by seemingly intractable disputes over absolutism versus relativism, or foundationalism versus fragmentation. The legacy of Michel Foucault has played a crucial role in these debates and his work is itself often associated with a fragmentary, postmodern politics.

"Foucault and Social Dialogue: Beyond Fragmentation offers a fascinating way out of this impasse. With clarity and insight, Christopher Falzon shows that the proper alternative to foundationalism is not fragmentation but dialogue and that we must turn to Foucault for such inspiration. Through this dialogical reading of Foucault he provides a compelling introduction to the ethical and political importance of Foucault's work.

"Christopher Falzon also provides a rethinking of the important debate between Habermas and Foucault, and shows how Foucault effectively challenges Habermas' position. Throughout, clear links are established with contemporary debates in continental philosophy and the full significance of Foucault's ethical and political theory is assessed.

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Farganis, James, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Theory and Society 10:5 (September 1981), 741-745.

Feaver, George, Review of Michel Foucault: An Introduction to the Study of His Thought, by Barry Cooper. Canadian Journal of Political Science 17 (June 1984), 420-422.

Feldman, Shoshana, "Madness and Philosophy or Literature's Reason." In Graphesis: Perspectives in Literature and Philosophy. Marie-Rose Logan, Ed. Yale French Studies 52 (1975), 206-228.

Ferguson, Harvie, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. International Journal of Criminology and Penology 6 (1978), 269-271.

Ferreira-Buckley, Linda, "Rescuing the Archives from Foucault." College English 61:5 (May 1999), 577-

Fielding, Helen, "Foucault and Merleau-Ponty." Philosophy Today 43:1 (Spring 1999), 73-

Figlio, Karl, Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. British Journal for the History of Science 10 (1977), 164-167.

Fillingham, Lydia Alix. Foucault for Beginners. Illustrated by Moshe Susser. New York: Writers and Readers, 1993. Riters and Readers Documentary Comic Books, 62.

"Michel Foucault's work has profoundly affected the teaching of such diverse disciplines as literary crticism, criminology, and gender studies. Arguing that definitions of abnormal behavior are culturally constructed, Foucault explored the unfair divisions between those who meet and those who deviate from social norms.

"Foucault's deeply visual sense of scences such as ritual public executions, lends itself well to Moshe Susser's dramatic illustrations." from the back cover

To order the paperback edition of Foucault for Beginners, go to:

Fillion, Real Robert, "Foucault contra Taylor: Whose Sources? Whose Self?" Dialogue 34 (Fall 1995), 663-674.

Fine, Bob, "Struggles Against Discipline: The Theory and Politics of Michel Foucault." Capital and Class 9 (1979), 75-96.

Fine, Bob, "The Birth of Bourgeois Punishment." Crime and Social Justice 13 (1980), 19-26.

Fink-Eitel, Hinrich. Foucault: An Introduction. Translated from the German (Hamburg, 1988) by Edward Dixon. Philadelphia: Pennbridge Books, 1992.

"There is a tendency to place Foucault squarely in the post-structuralist camp of his fellow French theoreticians Derrida, Lyotard, Deleuze, etc. While Foucault certainly shares the major concerns about language, meaning and the 'subject' with these other thinkers, there is still a profoundly 'political' message in Foucaullt's life and work that challenges the idea of him as simply another apolitical (or even neo-conservatism) post-structural, post-modern thinker.

"What Fink-Eitel has done is to present us with an image of Foucault that is somewhat closer to Jean-Paul Sartre than to Derrida. Fink-Eitel suggests that Foucault had come to reject the profoundly elitist nihilism of Nietzsche in favor of a radical, even anarchistic, politics of engagement whereby the 'intellectuals' would be responsible for providing the 'activists' with the necessary analysis to challenge the mechanisms of power." from the back cover

Fisher, Dominique D., "Should Feminists Forget Foucault?" Studies in 20th Century Literature 22:1 (Winter 1998), 227-


A | B | C | D | E | F | by Foucault | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Flaskas, Carmel, and Catherine Humphreys, "Theorizing About Power: Intersecting the Ideas of Foucault with the 'Problem' of Power in Family Therapy." Family Process 32:1 (March 1993), 35-47.

Fleming, Marie, "Working in the Philosophical Discourse of Modernity: Habermas, Foucault, and Derrida." Philosophy Today 40 (Spring 1996), 169-178.

Flynn, Bernard Charles, "Michel Foucault and Comparative Civilizational Study." Philosophy and Social Criticism and Cultural Hermeneutics 5:2 (1978), 145-158.

Flynn, Bernard Charles, "Michel Foucault and the Husserlian Problematic of a Transcendental Philosophy of History." Philosophy Today 22 (1978), 224-38.

Flynn, Thomas R., "Truth and Subjectivation in the Later Foucault." Journal of Philosophy 82 (October 1985), 531-540+.

Flynn, Thomas R., "Foucault as Parrhesiast: His Last Course at College de France." Philosophy and Social Criticism 12 (Summer 1987)

Flynn, Thomas R., "Foucault and the Politics of Postmodernity." Nous 23:2 (April 1989)

Flynn, Thomas R., "Foucault and the Spaces of History." Monist 74 (April 1991), 165-186.

Flynn, Thomas R., "Foucault and the Eclipse of Vision." In Modernity and the Hegemony of Vision. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993. pp. 273-286.

Flynn, Thomas R., "Truth is a Thing in the World." Research in Phenomenology 23 (1993), 192-201.

Flynn, Thomas R. Sartre, Foucault and Historical Reason, Vol. 1: Toward an Existentialist Theory of History. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1997.

"Sartre and Foucault were two of the most prominent and at times mutually antagonistic philosophical figures of the twentieth century. And nowhere are the antithetical natures of their existentialist and poststructuralist philosophies more apparent than in their disparate approaches to historical understanding."

"A history, thought Foucault, should be a kind of map, a comparative charting of structural transformations and displacements. But for Sartre, authentic historical understanding demanded a much more personal and committed narrative, a kind of interpretive diary of moral choices and risks compelled by critical necessity and an exacting reality. Sartre's history, a rational history of individual lives and their intrinsic social worlds, was in essence immersed in biography.

"In Volume One of this authoritative two-volume work, Thomas R. Flynn conducts a pivotal and comprehensive reconstruction of Sartrean historical theory, and provocatively anticipates the Foucauldian counterpoint to come in Volume Two." from the University of Chicago Press on-line catalog


"In this first of a two-volume study, the author reconstructs a Sartrean theory of history from the vast corpus of Sartre's writings, including hundreds of posthumously published pages and two unpublished manuscripts. Though the author's larger goal is to contrast the resultant philosophy with a poststructuralist 'mapping' of history in his second volume, the present work constitutes a free-standing text that examines the core of an existentialist theory. That theory turns on the threefold primacy (ontological, epistemic, and moral) of individual praxis in human history. As existentialist, the historian must capture the risk of choice and the pinch of the real in his or her account in order to 'comprehend the comprehension' of the historical agent in its existential situation. So Sartre's increasingly detailed existential 'psychoanalyses' of Baudelaire, Genet, himself, and others, culminating in his three-volume study of the life and times of Gustave Flaubert, The Family Idiot, should be seen as objective lessons in an existentialist theory of history

"If Sartre's project is imaginative (The Family Idiot being a sequel to his early The Psychology of Imagination), however, it is also moral. He is ever in search of the means to ascribe responsibility to historical agents for even the most 'impersonal' necessities an social systems. Sartre offers a social ontology that both fosters this transmission of responsibility and accounts for the unintended consequences of our intentional acts. In the latter case, he undertakes a close analysis of a boxing match as the key to the intelligibility of our history that is both violent and rife with dialectical necessities (the feints and jabs of counterfactuality). This is exemplified in a study of the 'venture' of Stalinism in the 1930s that sketches yet another existential psychoanalysis, this time of the dictator, whose idiosyncrasy cannot be separated from his dictatorship if a 'living history' is to be reconstituted. A properly existentialist theory of history, then , turns on the relationship between history and biography, though it is not simply another form of psychohistory.

"The author examines concomitant issues of 'committed history.' history as fact and as value, recorded history as poiesis, and the historian as dramaturge. In the concluding chapter he notes explicit criticisms leveled by each philosopher against the other and initiates his contrast with a brief survey of Foucauldian alternatives to Sartean concepts and methods. The aesthetic and ethical interests of each author, however, provide an initial basis on which to pursue the comparison." author's note in History and Theory, 37:2 (May 1998), 283-284.

To order the hardcover edition of Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason, go to:
To order the paperback edition of Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason, go to:

Flyvbjerg, Bent, "Habermas and Foucault: Thinkers for Civil Society?" British Journal of Sociology 49:2 (June 1998), 210-

Foote, Catherine E. Toward a New Understanding of the Problem of Spousal and Child Support After Separation and Divorce Through Michel Foucault's Analytics of Power. Toronto: University of Toronto School of Social Work, 1986. Working Papers on Social Welfare in Canada.

Forrester, John, "Michel Foucault and the History of Psychanalysis." History of Science 18 (1980), 286-301.

Foss, Paul, "The Lottery of Life." In Michel Foucault: Power Truth Strategy Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp. 169-184.

Foucault, Michel, and Ludwig Binswanger. Dream & Existence. Keith Hoeller, Ed. Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press, 1993. Studies in Existential Psychology and Psychiatry.

"In 1930, just three years after the publication of Heidegger's monumental philosophical work, Being and Time, the Swiss psychiatrist Ludwig Binswanger published the first essay in a new discipline he called 'existential analysis'. This essay, 'Dream and Existence,' offered a radical alternative to Freud's own Interpretation of Dreams. In 1954, Michel Foucault, the famous author of Madness and Civilization (1961), published his first work, 'Dream, Imagination, and Existence,' a lengthy introduction to Binswanger's pioneering essay in existential psychiatry.

"Foucault's early essay on dreams, which has long been out of print and difficult to obtain, even in France, appears here in English for the very first time. Dream and Existence also includes the definitive translation of Binswanger's groundbreaking article. Together, these two essays by Foucault and Binswanger present a strong case for the relevance of the existential approach to dreams and for viewing the world of the dreamer in a new, existential light." from the back cover

Contents: Keith Hoeller, "Editor's Forword"; Forrest Williams, "Translator's Preface"; Michel Foucault, "Dream, Imagination, and Existence" (translated by Forrest Williams); Ludwig Binswanger, "Dream and Existence" (translated by Jacob Needleman).

Originally published as Review of Existential Psychology and Psychiatry, 19:1 (1985).

Foucault, Michel. Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason Translated by Richard Howard. New York: Pantheon, 1965.

Abridged version of Folie et deraison, (1961).

"In recent years the question of madness and how to define it has become the center of a great deal of discussion. This is the question the distinguished French psychologist and philosopher Michel Foucault seeks to answer by studying madness from 1500 to 1800 -- from the Middle Ages when insanity was considered part of everyday life and fools and madmen walked the streets, to the point when these people began to be considered a threat, asylums were built for the first time, and a wall was erected between the insane and the rest of humanity." from the back cover of the paperback (1973)

To order the paperback edition of Madness and Civilization, go to:

Foucault, Michel. Mental Illness and Psychology. Translated by Alan Sheridan. New York: Harper and Row, 1976.

Based on Maladie mentale et psychologie (1962).

To order the paperback edition of Mental Illness and Psychology, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "The Father's 'No'." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 68-86.

A review of Jean Laplanche's Holderlin et la question du pere, originally published as "Le 'non' du pere," Critique 178 (1962), 195-209.

Foucault, Michel, Death and the Labyrinth: The World of Raymond Roussel. Charles Raus, translator. Garden City: Doubleday, 1986.

Translated from the French edition, Raymond Roussel, (1963).

Foucault, Michel, "Language to Infinity." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 53-67.

Originally published as "Le langage a l'infiniti," Tel Quel 15 (1963), 44-53.

Foucault, Michel, "A Preface to Transgression." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 29-52.

On Georges Battaille. Originally published as "Preface a la transgression," Critique 195-196 (1963), 751-770.

Foucault, Michel. The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences. New York: Pantheon,and London: Tavistock, 1970.

"This book, by the author of Madness and Civilization, has been hailed as the most important French contribution to philosophy since Sartre. Its thesis is that 'man' has only quite recently emerged as an object of our knowledge: our present concept of man is the result of a mutation within our culture. Michel Foucault studies this mutation, from the seventeenth century onward, cutting across numerous disciplines, first with a study of the classical 'human sciences,' and then with an analysis of their nineteenth-century successors -- philology, biology, and political economy.

"The result is, indeed, an archaeology of the human sciences, ananalysis of their foundations, their substrata, a reflection on what makes them possible now: an archaeology of contemporary modes of thought. It is also a critical reflection, for the day may not be far off when conditions will change once again, 'man' will disappear, and a new mode of thought will come into being." from the back cover of the American paperback edition (1973)


"In the work that established him as the most important French thinker since Sartre, Michel Foucault offers startling evidence that 'man' -- man as a subject of scientific knowledge -- is at best a recent invention, the result of a fundamental mutation in our culture.

"With vast erudition, Foucault cuts across disciplines and reaches back into the seventeenth century to show how classical systems of knowledge, which linked all of nature within a great chain of being and saw analogies between the stars in the heavens and the features in a human face, gave way to the modern sciences of biology, philology, and political economy. The result is nothing less than an archaeology of the sciences that unearths old patterns of meaning and reveals the shocking arbitrariness of our received truths." from the back cover of the American paperback edition (1994)

To order the paperback edition of The Order of Things, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Fantasia of the Library." Translation by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 87-109.

On G. Flaubert, La tentation de Saint Antoine. Originally published as "Un 'fantastique de bibliotheque'," Cahiers de la compagnie M. Renaud-J. L. Barrault 59 (1967), 7-30.

Foucault, Michel, "On the Archaeology of the Sciences." Theoretical Practice 3/4 (Autumn 1971)

Foucault, Michel, "History, Discourse and Discontinuity." Translation by Anthony M. Nazzaro. Salmagundi 20 (Summer-Fall 1972), 225-248.

Originally published as "Reponse a une question" Esprit 5 (1968).

Foucault, Michel, "Politics and the Study of Discourse." Translation by Anthony M. Nazzaro, revised by Colin Gordon. Ideology & Consciousness 3 (Spring 1978), 7-26.

Originally published as "Reponse a une question" Esprit 5 (1968). Revised translation of "History, Discourse and Discontinuity," Salmagundi (Spring 1972).

Foucault, Michel. The Archaeology of Knowledge and the Discourse on Language. A. M. Sheridan Smith, translator. New York: Pantheon, 1972.

Originally published in France under the title L'Archeologie du Savoir (Paris: Editions Gallimard, 1969). The Discourse on Language was originally published in French under the title L'Ordre du discours (Paris: Editions Gallimard, 1971). English translation by Rupert Swyer.

"Madness, sexuality, power, knowledge--are these facts of life or simply parts of speech? In a series of works of astonishing brilliance, historian Michel Foucault has excavated the hidden assumptions that govern the way we live and the way we think. The Archaeology of Knowledge begins at thelevel of 'things said' and moves quickly to illuminate the connections between knowledge, language, and action in a style at once profound and personal. A summing up of Foucault's own methodological assumptions, this book is also a first step toward a genealogy of the way we live now. Challenging, at times infuriating, it is an absolutely indispensable guide to one of the most innovative thinkers now writing." from the back cover of the Pantheon Books paperback edition (1972).

Contents: Part I: Introduction. Part II: The Discursive Regularities. 1. The Unities of Discourse. 2. Discursive Formations. 3. The Formation of Objects. 4. The Formation of Enunciative Modalities. 5. The Formation of Concepts. 6. The Formation of Strategies. 7. Remarks and Consequences. Part III: The Statement and the Archive. 1. Defining the Statement. 2. The Enunciative Function. 3. The Description of Statements. 4. Rarity, Exteriority, Accumulation. 5. The Historical a priori and the Archive. Part IV: Archaeological Description. 1. Archaeology and the History of Ideas. 2. The Original and the Regular. 3. Contradictions. 4. The Comparative Facts. 5. Change and Transformations. 6. Science and Knowledge. Part V: Conclusion. Appendix: The Discourse on Language.

To order the paperback edition of Archaeology of Knowledge, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "What is an Author?" Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 113-138.

Originally a lecture before the Society at the College de France, 22 February 1969, it was first published in the Bulletin de la Societe Francaise de Philosophie, 63:3 (1969), 73-104. "We have omitted Professor Wahl's introductory remarks and also Foucault's response and the debate that followed his lecture. Foucault's intitial statement, however, has been interpolated in the first paragraph of the translation." editor's note

Foucault, Michel, "Theatrum Philosophicum." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 165-197.

A review of Gilles Deleuze's Difference et repetition, and Logique du sens, originally published in Critique, 282 (1970), 885-908.

Foucault, Michel, "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History." Semiotext(e) 3

Foucault, Michel, "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 139-164.

First published in Hommage a Jean Hyppolite, (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1971), pp. 145-172. Reprinted in The Foucault Reader, Paul Rabinow, Ed.

Foucault, Michel, "A Conversation with M. Foucault." Partisan Review 2 (1971)

Foucault, Michel, "Orders of Discourse." Translated by Rupert Swyer. In Social Science Information. 10:2 (1971), 7-30.

Foucault, Michel. "Monstrosities in Criticism." Translated by Robert J. Matthews. diacritics. 1 (Fall 1971), 57-60.

Foucault, Michel, "Foucault Responds/2" diacritics 1 (Winter 1971), 60.

Foucault, Michel, "History of Systems of Thought." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 199-204.

Summary of a course given at the College de France-- 1970-1971.

Foucault, Michel, "Revolutionary Action: 'Until Now'." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 218-233.

An interview, first published in Actuel, 14 (Nov 1971), 42-47.

Foucault, Michel, "On Popular Justice: A Discussion with Maoists." Translated by John Mepham. In Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977. Colin Gordon, Ed. Harvester Press, London, and New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. pp. 1-36.

Originally published as "Sur la justice populaire: debat avec les maos," Les Temps Modernes 310 bis, 1972: a special issue entitled Nouveau fascisme, nouvelle democratie.

Foucault, Michel, "Intellectuals and Power." Telos 16 (1973)

Foucault, Michel, "Intellectuals and Power." Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977. pp. 205-

A conversation between Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze, 4 March 1972, first published in L'Arc No. 49, pp. 3-10.

Foucault, Michel. The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception. Translated by A. M. Sheridan-Smith. New York: Pantheon, and London: Tavistock, 1973.

"In the eighteenth century, medicine underwent a mutation. For the first time, medical knowledge took on a precision that had formerly belonged only to mathematics. The body became something that could be mapped. Disease became subject to new rules of classification. And doctors began to describe phenomena that for centuries had remained below the threshold of the visable and expressible.

"In The Birth of the Clinic the philosopher and intellectual historian who may be the true heir to Nietzsche charts this dramatic transformation of medical knowledge. As in his classic Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault shows how much what we think of as pure science owes to social and cultural attitudes -- in this case, to the climate of the French Revolution. Brilliant, provocative, and omnivorously learned, his book sheds new light on the origins of our current notions of health and sickness, life and death." from the back cover

To order the paperback edition of The Birth of the Clinic, go to:

Foucault, Michel, Ed. I, Pierre Riviere, having slaughtered my mother, my sister, and my brother ...: A Case of Paracide in the 19th Century. Translated by Frank Jelinek. New York: Pantheon, 1975.

Originally published in France as Moi, Pierre Riviere ayant egorge ma mere, ma soeur et mon frere ... (Paris: Editions Gallimard, 1973). "This work is the outcome of a joint research project by a team engaged in a seminar at the College de France."

"I, Pierre Riviere ... is a shocking study of madness in the age of reason. The extraordinary story of a brutal crime in a small nineteenth-century French village is movingly and strikingly told in the first half of the book, through the actual documents of the case, and in the words of its participants and observers--witnesses, judges, doctors, lawyers, peasants. At the center of the tale is the memoir of the killer himself, one of the most haunting and beautiful expressions of the power of derangement to be found in Western writing.

"Yet, I, Pierre Riviere ... is far more than just an account of a gruesome murder, for Foucault and his associates use this case to illuminate the history of psychology and the history of crime. In the second half of the book they show how the doctors of the day contended with the judges and lawyers and among themselves over the meaning of madness and sanity and the use of psychiatric concepts in the crimnal justice system. In the wings stand the lawyers of King Louis-Philippe, fearful of the association of patricide with regicide and the use of the newly emerging doctrine of 'extenuating circumstances.' In the background are the villagers of Aunay, struggling to defuse the terror of a crime committed in their midst. And always at the center is Pierre, a peasant, whose eloquent memoir is to some a proof of rationality (and thus grounds for condemning him to death) and to others a sign of madness (and therefore grounds for shutting him up for life). I, Pierre Riviere ... is a brilliant, highly readable, and gripping exploration of the roots of our contemporary views of madness, justice, and crime."

Contents: Foreword. I. The Dossier. 1.Case and Arrest. 2. The Preliminary Investigation. 3. The Memoir. 4. Medico-legal Opinions. 5. The Trial. 6. Prison and Death. II. Notes. 1. Jean-Pierre Peter and Jeanne Favret, "The Animal, the Madman, and Death." 2. Michel Foucault, "Tales of Murder." 3. Patricia Moulin, "Extenuating Circumstances." 4. Blandine Barret-Kriegel, "Regicide and Parricide." 5. Philippe Riot, "The Parallel Lives of Pierre Riviere." 6. Robert Castel, "The Doctors and Judges." 7. Alexandre Fontana, "The Intermittences of Rationality."

To order the paperback edition of I, Pierre Riviere ..., go to:

Foucault, Michel. This is Not a Pipe. Translated and edited by James Harkness. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983.

A translation of Ceci n'est pas une pipe (Montpellier: Editions fata morgana, 1973).

"What does it mean to write 'This is not a pipe' across a bluntly literal painting of a pipe? Rene Magritte's famous canvas provides the starting point for a delightful homage by the French philosopher-historian Michel Foucault. Much better known for his incisive and mordant explorations of power and social exclusion, Foucault here assumes a more playful stance. By exploring the nuances and ambiguities of Magritte's visual critique of language, he finds the painter less removed than previously thought from the pioneers of modern abstraction--'confronting them and within a common system, a figure at once opposed and complementary.'

"Foucault's brief but extraordinarily rich essay offers a startling, highly provocative view of a painter whose influence and popularity contine to grow unchecked. This Is Not a Pipe also throws a new, piquantly dancing light on Foucault himself." from the back cover of the paperback edition

To order the paperback edition of This Is Not a Pipe, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Power and Norms: Notes." Translated by W. Suchting. In Michel Foucault: Power Truth Strategy Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp.

"These notes are from a lecture given by Michel Foucault at the College de France, 28/3/1973. The translator consulted a German version in Mikrophysik der Macht. Uber Strafjustiz, Psychiatrie und Medizin (Internationale Marxistische 61, Berlin: Merve Verlag, 1976)."

Foucault, Michel, "Michel Foucault on Attica: An Interview." Telos 19 (1974), 154-161.

Foucault, Michel, "The Political Function of the Intellectual." Translated by Colin Gordon. Radical Philosophy 17 (Summer 1977), 12-14.

"The text here translated consists of extracts, published in Politique Hebdo No. 247, 29 November 1976, from a preface to the Italian translation of a collection of articles and interviews by Michel Foucault, entitled 'Microphysics of Power', to be published shortly by Einaudi, Turin. The preface is in the form of an interview with Alexandra Fontana and Pasquale Pasquine."

Foucault, Michel, "Truth and Power." Translated by Paul Patton and Meaghan Morris. In Michel Foucault: Power, Truth, Strategy. Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp. 29-48.

Original interview with Alessandro Fontano and Pasquale Pasquino. The French version appeared in L'Arc 70 as "Verite et pouvoir." "The translators are also deeply indebted to Colin Gordon, who gave us the benefit of his own version of this text, and his permission to incorporate certain sections of his translation into our own."

"Footnote: This text has a complicated history and has been published in various versons in several languages. The original interview, conducted in Italian, is a preface to the Italian translation of a collection of texts by Foucault. A German translation of the interview was published in W. Seitter, Michel Foucault, Von der Subversion des Wisens, Munich, 1974.

"Extracts were published in French in Politique Hebdo, 247 (29 Nov. 1976). An English translation of these was published by Colin Gordon in Radical Philosophy, 17 (Summer 1977). A more extemsive French translation appeared in L'Arc 70: La crise dans la tete (1977). Our text is based on that of L'Arc, with additional material incorporated by permission of Colin Gordon."

Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Translated by Alan Sheridan. New York: Pantheon, 1978.

Originally published in France as Surveiller et Punir: Naissance de la prison (Paris: Editions Gaillimard, 1975).

"In this brilliant study, one of the most influential philosophers alive sweeps aside centuries of sterile debate about prison reform and gives a highly provocative account of how penal institutions and the power to punish became a part of our lives. Foucault explains the alleged failures of the modern prison by showing how the very concern with rehabilitation encourages and refines criminal activity." from the back cover of the Vintage Books paperback edition (1979).

Contents: Part One: Torture. 1. The Body of the Condemned. 2. The Spectacle of the Scaffold. Part Two: Punishment. 1. Generalized Punishment. 2. The Gentle Way in Punishment. Part Three: Discipline. 1. Docile Bodies. The Art of Distributions. The Control of Activity. The Organizations of Geneses. The Composition of Forces. 2. The Means of Correct Training. Hierarchical Observation. Normalizing Judgement. The Examination. 3. Panopticism. Part Four: Prison. 1. Complete and Austere Institutions. 2. Illegalities and Delinquency. 3. The Carceral.

To order the paperback edition of Discipline and Punish, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Prison Talk: An Interview with Michel Foucault." Translated by Colin Gordon. Radical Philosophy 16 (Spring 1977), 10-15.

"This interview dates from June 1975 ... [It] first appeared in Le magazine litteraire; the interviewer was J.-J. Brochier." Reprinted in Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977, Colin Gordon, Ed. Harvester Press, London, and New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. pp. 36-54.

Foucault, Michel, "Body/Power." Translated by Colin Gordon. In Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977. Colin Gordon, Ed. Harvester Press, London, and New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. pp. 55-62.

An interview with the editorial collective of Quel Corps?, originally published as "Pouvoir et Corps," in Quel Corps? (September/October 1975).

Foucault, Michel, "Two Lectures," Translated by Kate Soper. In Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977. Colin Gordon, Ed. Harvester Press, London, and New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. pp. 78-108.

These two lectures, given on January 7th and 14th, 1976, originally transcribed and translated by Alessandro Fontana and Pasquale Pasquino in Michel Foucault, Microfisica del Potere (Turin, 1977).

Foucault, Michel. The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1: An Introduction. Translated by Robert Hurley. New York: Pantheon, 1978.

Originally published as La Volente de savoir (Paris, Editions Gallimard, 1976).

"Why has there been such a veritable explosion of discussion about sex in the West since the seventeenth century? How did we ever come to believe that our increasing talk about it would make us less repressed? In this first of a proposed six-volume work, Michel Foucault offers a dazzling, iconoclastic exploration of why we feel compelled to continually analyze and discuss sex, and of the social and mental mechanisms of power that cause us to direct the question of what we are to what our sexuality is." from the back cover of the Vintage Books paperback edition (1980)

Contents: Part One: We "Other Victorians." Part Two: The Repressive Hypothesis. Chapter 1. The Incitement to Discourse. Chapter 2. The Perverse Implantation. Part 3. Scientia Sexualis. Part Four: The Deployment of Sexuality. Chapter 1. Objective. Chapter 2. Method. Chapter 3. Domain. Chapter 4. Periodization. Part Five: Right of Death and Power over Life.

To order the paperback edition of The History of Sexuality: An Introduction, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Questions on Geography." Translated by Colin Gordon. In Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977 Colin Gordon, Ed. Harvester Press, London, and New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. pp. 63-77.

An interview with the editors of the journal Herodote, originally published as "Questions a Michel Foucault sur la geographie," Herodote 1 (1976).

Foucault, Michel, "Inteview with Lucette Finas." Translated by Paul Foss and Meaghan Morris. In Michel Foucault: Power Truth Strategy Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp. 67-75.

"[F]irst appeared in La Quinzaine litteraire, 247 (1-15 Jan 1977) as "Les rapports de pouvoir passent a l'interieur des corps," pp. 4-6."

Foucault, Michel, "The Life of Infamous Men." Translated by Paul Foss and Meaghan Morris. In Michel Foucault: Power Truth Strategy Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp. 76-91.

"[F]irst appeared in Les Cahiers du Chemin, 29 (1977) as "La vie des hommes infames," pp.12-29."

Foucault, Michel, "Power and Sex." Translated by David J. Parent. Telos 32 (Summer 1977),

Foucault, Michel. Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Donald F. Bouchard, Ed. Translated by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977.

Includes: "A Preface to Transgression"; "Language to Infinity"; "The Father's 'No'"; "Fantasia of the Library"; "What is an Author?"; "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History"; "Theatrum Philosophicum"; "History of Systems of Thought"; "Intellectuals and Power"; "Revolutionary Action: 'Until Now'."

To order the paperback edition of Language, Counter Memory, Practice, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Governmentality." Translated by Rosi Braidotti. I & C 6 (Autumn 1979),

Revised translation by Colin Gordon published in Burchell, Gordon and Miller, Eds., The Foucault Effect.

Foucault, Michel. Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972-1977. Colin Gordon, Ed. New York: Pantheon, 1980.

"Michel Foucault has become famous for a series of books that have permanently altered our understanding of many institutions of Western society. He analyzed mental institutions in the remarkable Madness and Civilization; hospitals in The Birth of the Clinic; prisons in Discipline and Punish; and schools and families in The History of Sexuality. But the general reader as well as the specialist is apt to miss the consistent purposes that lie behind these difficult individual studies, thus losing sight of the broad social vision and political aims that unify them.

"Now in this superb set of essays and interviews, Foucault provides a much-needed guide to Foucault. These pieces, ranging over the entire spectum of his concerns, enable Foucault, in his most intimate and accessible voice, to interpret the conclusions of his research in each area and to demonstrate the contribution of each to the magnificent--and terrifying--portrait of society that he is patiently compiling.

"For, as Foucault shows, what he has always been describing is the nature of power in society; not the conventional treatment of power that concentrates on powerful individuals and repressive institutions, but the much more pervasive and insidious mechanisms by which power 'reaches into the very grain of individuals, touches their bodies and inserts itself into their actions and attitudes, their discourses, learning processes and everyday lives.'"

"Foucault's investigations of prisons, schools, barracks, hospitals, factories, cities, lodgings, families, and other organinized forms of social life are each a segment of one of the most astonishing intellectual enterprises of all time--and, as this book proves, one which possesses profound implications for understanding the social control of our bodies and our minds." from the back cover of the Pantheon Books paperback edition (1980)

Includes: "On Popular Justice: A Discussion with Maoists"; "Prison Talk"; "Body/Power"; "Questions of Geography"; "Two Lectures"; "Truth and Power"; "Power and Strategies"; "The Eye of Power"; "The Politics of Health in the Eighteenth Century"; "The History of Sexuality"; "The Confession of the Flesh"; "Afterword."

To order the paperback edition of Power/Knowledge, go to:

Foucault, Michel. Herculine Barbin; Being the Recently Discovered Memoirs of a Nineteenth-Century French Hermaphrodite Richard McDougall, translator. New York: Pantheon Books, 1980

To order the paperback edition of Herculine Barbin ..., go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Questions of Method." Translated by Colin Gordon. I & C 8 (Spring 1981),

Reprinted, with minor corrections, in Burchell, Gordon and Miller, Eds., The Foucault Effect.

Foucault, Michel, "Questions of Method: An Interview with Michel Foucault." Translated by Alan Bass. In After Philosophy: End or Transformation? Kenneth Baynes, James Bohman, and Thomas McCarthy, Eds. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1987. pp. 100-124.

Foucault, Michel, "The Order of Discourse." Translated by Ian McLeod. In Untying the Text: A Post-Structuralist Reader. Robert Young, Ed. Boston and London: Routledge, Kegan Paul, 1981. pp. 51-78.

Foucault, Michel, with Richard Sennett, "Sexuality and Solitude" London Review of Books (21 May 1981), 3-7.

Foucault, Michel., "Is it Useful to Revolt?" Philosophy and Social Criticism 8 (Spring 1981)

Foucault, Michel. Remarks on Marx: Conversations with Duccio Trombadori. Translated by R. James Goldstein and James Cascaito. 1981; New York: Semiotext(e), 1991. Foreign Agents series.

Includes: "How an 'Experience-Book' is Born"; "The Subject, Knowledge, and the 'History of Truth'"; "'But Structuralism was not a French Invention'"; "Adorno, Horkheimer, and Marcuse: Who is a 'Negator' of History?"; "Between 'Words' and 'Things' during May '68"; "The Discourse of Power."

To order the paperback edition of Remarks on Marx, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Is it Really Important to Think?" Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (Spring 1982),

Foucault, Michel, Response to Susan Sontag. Soho News (2 March 1982), 13.

Foucault, Michel, "Structuralism and Poststructuralism: An Interview with Gerard Raulet." Telos 55 (Spring 1983), 195-211.

Foucault, Michel. The Foucault Reader. Paul Rabinow, Ed. New York: Pantheon, 1984.

"Michel Foucault was one of the most influential thinkers in the contemporary world, someone whose work has affected the teaching of half a dozen disciplines ranging from literary criticism to the history of criminology. But of his many books, not one offers a satisfactory introduction to the entire complex body of his work. The Foucault Reader was commissioned precisely to serve that purpose.

"The Reader contains selections from each area of Foucault's work as well as a wealth of previously unpublished writings, including important material of previously unpublished writings, including important material written especially for this volume, the preface to the long-awaited second volume of The History of Sexuality, and interviews with Foucault himself, in the course of which he discussed his philosophy at first hand and with unprecedented candor.

"The philosophy comprises an astonishing intellectual enterprise: a minute and ongoing investigation of the nature of power in society, schools, hospitals, factories, homes, families, and other forms of organized society are brought together in The Foucault Reader to create an overview of this theme and of the broad social and political vision that underlies it." from the back cover of the paperback edition

Contents: Paul Rabinow, "Introduction." Part I: Truth and Method. "What is Enlightenment?" "Truth and Power." "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History." "What Is an Author?" Part II: Practices and Knowledge. Madness and Civilization. "The Great Confinement." "The Birth of the Asylum." Disciplines and Sciences of the Individual. "The Body of the Condemned." "Docile Bodies." "The Means of Correct Training." "Panopticism." "Complete and Austere Institutions." "Illegalities and Delinquency." "The Carceral." "Space, Knowledge, and Power." Bio-power. "Right of Death and Power over Life." "The Politics of Health in the Eighteenth Century." Sex and Truth. "We 'Other Victorians'." "The Repressive Hypothesis." Practices and Science of the Self. "Preface to The History of Sexuality: Volume II." "On the Genealogy of Ethics: An Overview of Work in Progress." "Politics and Ehthcs: An Interview." "Polemics, Politics, and Problemization: An Interview with Michel Foucault."

To order the paperback edition of The Foucault Reader, go to:

Foucault, Michel. The Use of Pleasure: The History of Sexuality, Vol. 2. Translated by Robert Hurley. New York: Random House, 1985.

Originally published in French as L'Usage des plaisirs (Paris: Editions Gallimard, 1984).

"In this, the sequel to The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, the brilliantly original French thinker who died in 1984 gives an analysis of how the ancient Greeks perceived sexuality. Forthcoming are volumes III and IV of The History of Sexuality, concerned, respectively, with the later Greeks and Romans and with the early Christians.

"Throughout The Use of Pleasure Foucault analyzes an irresistable array of ancient Greek texts on eroticism as he tries to answer basic questions: How in the West did sexual experience become a moral issue? And why were other appetites of the body, such as hunger, and collective concerns, such as civic duty, not subjected to the numberless rules and regulations and judgments that have defined, if not confined, sexual behavior?" from the back cover of the Vintage Books paperback edition (1986)

To order the paperback edition of The Use of Pleasure, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Final Interview." Raritan 5 (Summer 1985)

Foucault, Michel. The Care of the Self: The History of Sexuality, Vol. 3. Translated by Robert Hurley. New York: Random House, 1986.

To order the paperback edition of The Care of the Self, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "Kant on Enlightenment and Revolution." Translated on Colin Gordon. Economy and Society 15:1 (February 1986), 88-96.

Foucault, Michel, "The Ethic of Care for the Self as a Practice of Freedom: An Interview with Michel Foucault." Philosophy and Social Criticism 12 (Summer 1987)

[Foucault, Michel] Maurice Florence, "(Auto)biography, Michel Foucault 1926-1984." History of the Present 4 (1988)

Foucault, Michel. Technologies of the Self: A Seminar with Michel Foucault. Luther H. Martin, Huck Gutman, and Partick H. Hutton, Eds. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988.

To order the paperback edition of Technologies of the Self, go to:

Foucault, Michel. Foucault Live (Interviews, 1966-84). Translated by John Johnston. Sylvere Lotringer, Ed. New York: Semiotext(e), 1989. Foreign Agents series.

Includes; "The Order of Things"; "The Discourse of History"; "Foucault Responds to Sartre"; "The Archeology of Knowledge"; "The Birth of a World"; "Rituals of Exclusion"; "An Historian of Culture"; "Film and Popular Memory"; "Sorcery and Madness"; "On Literature"; "The Politics of Soviet Crime"; "I, Pierre Riviere"; "The End of the Monarchy of Sex"; "The Anxiety of Judging"; "Clarifications on the Question of Power"; "The Masked Philosopher"; "Friendship as a Way of Life"; "Sexual Choice, Sexual Act"; "How Much Does it Cost to Tell the Truth?"; "An Ethics of Pleasure"; "What Calls for Punishment?"; "The Concern for Truth"; An Aesthetics of Existence"; "The Return of Morality."

Foucault, Michel. Politics, Philosophy, Culture: Interviews and Other Writings. Lawrence Kritzman, Ed. Translated by Alan Sheridan. London and New York: Routledge, 1990.

"...contains a rich selection of interviews and other writings by the late Michel Foucault. Drawing upon his revolutionary concept of power as well as his critique of the institutions that organize social life, Foucault discusses literature, music and the power of art while also examining concrete issues such as the Left in contemporary France, the social security system, the penal system, homosexualty, madness, and the Iranian Revolution." from the Routledge on-line catalog

To order the paperback edition of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, go to:

Foucault, Michel, "About the Beginnings of the Hermeneutics of the Self: Two Lectures at Dartmouth." Political Theory 21 (May 1993), 198-227.

Foucault, Michel, "Madness, the Absence of Work." Translated by Peter Stastny and Deniz Sengel. Critical Inquiry 21 (Winter 1995), 290-298.

Foucault, Michel. Foucault Live (Interviews, 1961-1984.) Sylvere Lotringer, Ed. Translated by Lysa Hochroth and John Johnston. New York: Semiotext(e), 1996. Semiotext(e) Double Agents series.

An expanded version of the 1989 edition.

Contents: 1. Madness Only Exists in Society. 2. Andre Breton: A Literature of Knowledge. 3. The Order of Things. 4. The Discourse of History. 5. History, Discourse and Discontinuity. 6. Foucault Responds to Sartre. 7. The Archeology of Knowledge. 8. The Birth of the World. 9. Rituals of Exclusion. 10. Intellectuals and Power. 11. Confining Societies. 12. An Historian of Culture. 13. The Equipments of Power. 14. On Attica. 15. Film and Popular Memory. 16. Talk Show. 17. From Torture to Cellblock.

Foucault, Michel. The Politics of Truth. Sylvere Lotringer and Lysa Hochroth, Eds. New York: Semiotext(e), 1997. Foreign Agents Series.

Includes: I. Kant, "Was ist Aufklarung?"; Michel Foucault, "What is Critique?"; What is Revolution?"; What is Enlightenment?"; "For an Ethics of Discomfort"; "What Our Present Is"; "Subjectivity and Truth"; Christianity and Confession."

Foucault, Michel, Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth Paul Rabinow, Ed. New York: The New Press, 1997. Essential Works of Foucault, 1945-1984, vol. 1.

"Few philosophers have had as strong an influence on the twentieth century as Michel Foucault. In 1994, ten years after his death, his French publisher, Gallimard, issued Dits et ecrits, the first complete collection of all Foucault's courses, articles, and interviews. Essential Works of Foucault, 1945-1984, brings the most important work from Dits et ecrits to English-speaking readers in a definitive, three-volume series edited by Paul Rabinow. This first volume contains the summaries of Foucault's courses at the College de France, paired with key writings and interviews on friendship, sexuality, and the care of the self and others.

To order the hardcover edition of Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth, go to:
To order the paperback edition of Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth, go to:

Foucault, Michel, Aesthetics, Method, and Epistemology. James D. Faubion, Ed. Paul Rabinow, Series Ed. New York: The New Press,1998. Essential Works of Foucault, 1945-1984, vol. 2.

"Few philosophers have had as strong an influence on the twentieth century as Michel Foucault. in 1994, ten years after his death, his French publisher, Gallimard, issued Dits et ecrits, the first complete collection of all Foucault's courses, articles, and interviews. Essential Works of Foucault, 1954-1984, brings the most important work from Dits et ecritsto American readers in a definitive, three-volume series directed by Paul Rabine. This second volume surveys Foucault's diverse but sustained addresss of the historical forms and interplay of passion, experience, and truth." from the back cover of the paperback edition

"Aesthetics, Method and Epistemology explores one of the lesser known aspects of Foucault's oeuvre. This volume surveys the philosopher's diverse but sustained address of the historical forms and interplay of passion, experience, and truth. These selections, most of which have not previously appeared in English translation, are a testament to the extraordinary range of Foucault's insight. They include commentaries on the work of de Sade, Rousseau, Marx, Freud, Roussel, and Boulez. They also include some of Foucault's most trechant reflections on the historical constitution and the historical diagnostics of both the aesthetic and the critical imagination and the historical diagnostics of both the aesthetic and the critical imagination, providing unique insight into the development of Foucault's original and exemplary philosophical program." from the New Press catalog

Contents: Paul Rabinow, "Series Preface"; James D. Faubion, "Introduction". Part One: Aesthetics. "The Father's 'No'"; "Speaking and Seeing in Raymond Roussel"; "Introduction to Rousseau's Dialogues"; "So Cruel a Knowledge"; "A Preface to Transgression"; "Language to Infinity"; "Afterword to The Temptation of Saint Anthony"; "The Prose of Actaeon", "Behind the Fable"; "The Thought of the Outside"; "A Swimmer Between Two Words"; "Different Spaces"; "This is Not a Pipe"; "What Is an Author?"; "Sade, Sergeant of Sex"; "The Gray Mornings of Tolerance"; "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse and the Everyday Worms"; "The Imagination of the Nineteenth Century"; "Pierre Boulez, Passing Throught the Screen".

Part Two: Methodology and Epistemology. "Philosophy and Psychology"; "The Order of Things"; "Nietzsche, Freud, Marx"; "On the Ways of Writing History"; "On the Archaelogy of the Sciences: Response to the Epistemology Circle"; "Madness and Society"; "Theatrum Philosophicum"; "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History"; "My Body, This Paper, This Fire"; "Return to History"; "Structuralism and Post-structuralism"; "Foucault", "Life: Experience and Science".

To order the hardcover edition of Aesthetics, Method and Epistemology, go to: To order the paperback edition of Aesthetics, Method and Epistemology, go to:

Foucault, Michel Religion and Culture. Jeremy Carrette, Ed. New York: Routledge, 1999.

"Postmodern theorist Michel Foucault is best known for his work on 'power/knowledge', and on the regulation of sexuality in modern society. Yet throughout his life, Foucault was continually concerned with Christianity, other spiritual movements and religious traditions, and the death of God, and these themes and materials scattered are throughout his many writings. Religion and Culture collects for the first time this important thinker's work on religion, religious experience, and society. Here are classic essays such as The Battle for Chastity, alongside those that have been less widely read in English or in French. Selections are arranged in three groupings: Madness, Religion and the Avant-Garde; Religions, Politics and the East; and Christianity, Sexuality and the Self: Fragments of an Unpublished Volume. Ranging from Foucault's earliest studies of madness to Confessions of the Flesh, the unpublished fourth volume of his History of Sexuality, his final thughts on early Christianity, Religion and Culture makes Foucault's work an indispensible part of contemporary religious thought, while also making an important link between religious studies and cultural studies." From the Routledge N.Y. online catalog

To order the hardcover edition of Religion and Culture, go to:
To order the paperback edition of Religion and Culture, go to:

Foucault, Michel, Power. Colin Gordon, Ed. Paul Rabinow, Series Ed. New York: The New Press, forthcoming [pub date: August 1999]. Essential Works of Foucault, 1945-1984, vol. 3.

"Power, the final volume of Essential Works of Foucault, 1954-1984, draws together philosopher Michel Foucault's contributions to what he saw as the still underdeveloped practice of political analysis. It covers the domains Foucault helped to make part of the core agenda of Western political culture--medicine, psychiatry, prisons, sexuality--illuminating and expanding on the themes of The Birth of the Clinic, Discipline and Punish, and the first volume of The History of Sexuality.

"Including important later writings, Power highlights Foucault's revolutionary analysis of the politics of personal conduct and freedom. It also documents Foucault's wide-ranging involvements through lectures, articles, and interviews published throughout the world, many unavailable in English until now." from the New Press catalog

To order the hardcover edition of Power, go to:

Fox, Nick J., "Foucault, Foucauldians and Sociology." British Journal of Sociology , 49:3 (1998), 415-

Fracchia, Joseph G., "Foucault, Marx, and the Historical-Materialist Horizon." Intellectual History Newsletter 20 (1998)

Part of a roundtable on "Foucault and Historical Materialism." See also contributions by Joan Cocks, Martin Jay, and the subsequent reply by Fracchia.

Fracchia, Joseph G., "Reply to Cocks and Jay." Intellectual History Newsletter 20 (1998)

Part of a roundtable on "Foucault and Historical Materialism." See also the initial contribution by Fracchia, as well as those by Joan Cocks and Martin Jay.

Frank, A., "The Politics of the New Positivity." Human Studies 5:1 (1982), 61-67.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Fraser, Mariam, "Feminism, Foucault and Deleuze." Theory, Culture and Society 14:2 (1997), 23-

Fraser, Nancy, "Foucault on Modern Power: Empirical Insights and Normative Confusions." Praxis International 1:3 (1981), 272-287.

Reprinted in Nancy Fraser, Unruly Practices.

Fraser, Nancy, Foucault's Body Language: A Posthumanist Political Rhetoric?" Salmagundi 61 (Fall 1983), 55-70.

Reprinted in Nancy Fraser, Unruly Practices.

Fraser, Nancy, Michel Foucault: A 'Young Conservative'?" Ethics 96:1 (October 1985), 165-184.

Reprinted in Nancy Fraser, Unruly Practices.

Fraser, Nancy. Unruly Practices: Power, Discourse and Gender in Contemporary Social Theory. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1989.

"Unruly Practices brings together a series of widely discussed essays in feminism and social theory. read together, they constitute a sustained critical encounter with leading European and American approaches to social theory. In addition, Nancy Fraser develops a new and original socialist-feminist critical theory that overcomes many of the limitations of current alternatives. First, in a series of critical essays, she deploys philosophical and literaty techniques to sort the wheat from the chaff in the work of Michel Foucault, the French deconstructionists, Richard Rorty, and Jurgen Habermas. Then, in a group of constructive essays, she incorporates their respective strengths in a new critical theory of late-capitalist political culture.

"Fraser breaks new methodoligically by integrating the previously divergent insights of poststructuralism, critical social theory, feminist theory, and pragmatism. Thematically, she deals with varied forms of dominance and subordination in modern, industrial, late-capitalism societies--especially gender dominance and subordination, state-bureacratic forms of organization, the institutional politics of knowledge and expertise, and the structure and function of social-welfare programs. In the last section of the book, these themes are integrated in an original theory of 'the politics of need interpretation.' This concept becomes the linchpin of the socialist-feminist critical theory proposed in the last chapter." from the back cover

To order the paperback edition of Unruly Practices, go to:

Freeman, Hugh, "Anti-psychiatry through History." New Society (4 May 1967), 665-666.

Freidrich, Otto, with Sandra Burton, "France's Philosopher of Power." Time (16 November 1981), 147-148.

Freundlieb, Dieter, "Rationalism v. Irrationalism?: Habermas's Response to Foucault." Inquiry 31 (June 1988), 171-192.

Freundlieb, Dieter, "Foucault and the Study of Literature." Poetics Today 16 (Summer 1995), 301-44.

Friedenberg, Edgar Z., "Sick, Sick, Sick?" New York Times Book Review (22 August 1965), 6.

Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault.

Fromm, Harold, "Scholarship as Opera: Foucault's Woodnotes Wilde" Hudson Review 46 (Autumn 1993), 513-525.

Frow, John, "Some Versions of Foucault Meanjin 47:1 (Autumn 1988), 144-156. 47:2 (Winter 1988), 353-365.

Gabbard, David. Silencing Ivan Illich: A Foucauldian Analysis of an Intellectual Repression. San Francisco: Austin and Winfield, 1993.

Gane, Mike, "The Form of Foucault." Economy and Society 15:1 (February 1986), 110-122.

Review article on A. Sheridan, Michel Foucault: The Will to Truth, C. C. Lemert and G. Gillian, Michel Foucault: Social Theory and Transgression, H. L. Dreyfus and P. Rabinow, Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, M. Clark, Michel Foucault: An Annotated Bibliography, P. Major-Poetzl, Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Western Culture: Toward a New Science of History, M. Poster, Foucault, Marxism and History: Mode of Production versus Mode of Information, M. Cousins and A. Hussain, Michel Foucault, B. Smart, Michel Foucault, J. G. Merquior, Foucault, and P. Rabinow, Ed., The Foucault Reader.

Gane, Mike, Ed. Towards a Critique of Foucault. London and New York: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1986. Economy and Society series.

"The work of Michel Foucault, one of the most influential of modern French social theorists and philosophers, has had a dramatic and far-reaching effect on many disciplines. These essays present Foucault's work as an important contribution to the theoretical analysis of history, language They also represent a critical response to this contribution, encouraging readers not only to read Foucault for themselves, but to think about some new problems ina new way." from the back cover

Includes: Mike Gane, "Introduction: Michel Foucault"; Michael Donnelly, "Foucault's Genealogy of the Human Sciences"; Beverley Brown and Mark Cousins, "The Linguistic Fault: the Case of Foucault's Archaeology"; Peter Dews, "The Nouvelle Philosophie and Foucault"; Jeff Minson, "Strategies for Socialists? Foucault's Conception of Power"; Gary Wickham, "Power and Power Analysis: Beyond Foucault."

Gane, Mike, and Terry Johnson, Ed. Foucault's New Domains. London: Routledge, 1993.

"This book explores the influence of Foucault's later writings on basic theoretical and research concerns in the social sciences. The introduction contextualizes the development of Foucault's writings within a biographical frame and leads into Foucault's College de France lecture, 'Kant on Enlightenment and Revolution' which (along with Colin Gordon's commentary) raises the issues crucial to Foucault's latter project: the relationship between reason and liberty. The answer suggested -- involving a reformulation of the relationship between the subject and power -- connects with the issues raised in subsequent chapters, including Pasquino's focus on the relationship between the governmentality of the modern state and the self-governing individual and Meuret's analysis of the link between Adam Smith's novel conception of political economy and the emergent political structures of modern capitalist states. The following four chapters all extend Foucault's insights into new domains of social analysis: namely the role of language in constructing and governing the economy (Miller and Rose), the shifting relations between sovereignty and responsibility in the welfare state (Donzelot), the role of the professional expert in constructing new social relatities amenable to governance (Johnson), the significance of the technologies of government in the development of a political rationality of the humanities (Hunter). In the final chapter Bevis, Cohen and Kendall subject Foucault's last major enterprise, the history of sexuality, to a critique, the critieria of which are derived from Foucault's own methodological measures of adequacy -- that it be a history of the present which enable us to think in novel ways and facilitates action. By showing how Foucault's writings increasingly influence and reconstruct social theory and analysis the book will appeal to a wide range of social scientist and other academics." from the Routledge online catalog

Gardiner, Michael, "Foucault, Ethics and Dialogue." History of the Human Sciences 9 (August 1996), 27-46.

Garland, David, "Frameworks of Inquiry in the Sociology of Punishment." British Journal of Sociology 41:1 (March 1990), 1-15.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Garland, David, "Criminological Knowledge and Its Relation to Power: Foucault's Genealogy and Criminology Today." British Journal of Criminology 32 (Autumn 1992), 403-422.

Garrison, J., "Foucault, Dewey, and Self-creation." Educational Philosophy and Theory 30:2 (1998), 111-

Gay, Peter, "Chains and Couches." Commentary 40:4 (1965), 93-95.

Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault.

Gearhart, Suzanne, "Foucault's Response to Freud: Sado-masochism and the Aestheticization of Power." Style 29 (Fall 1995), 389-403.

Gearhart, Suzanne, "The Taming of Michel Foucault: New Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and the Subversion ..." New Literary History 28:3 (Summer 1997), 457-

Geertz, Clifford, "Stir Crazy." New York Review of Books (26 January 1978), 4-6.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Genova, J., Review of Foucault, David Couzens Hoy, Ed. Choice 24 (March 1987), 1082

Giddings, Robert, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Dickens Studies Newsletter 12:1 (1981), 19-24.

Gilbert, Arthur, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. American Historical Review 84 (1979), 1020-1021.

Gillett, Grant, "Dennett, Foucault, and the Selection of Memes." Inquiry (Oslo) 42:1 (March 1999), 3-

Goldsmith, Francisca, Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. Library Journal 116 (15 November 1991), 90

Goldstein, Jan, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Journal of Modern History 51 (1979), 116-118.

Goldstein, Jan, "Foucault Among the Sociologists: The 'Disciplines' and the History of the Professions." History and Theory 23:2 (1984), 170-192.

Goldstein, Jan, "Framing the Discipline with Law: Problems and Promises of the Liberal State." American Historical Review 98 (April 1993), 354-363.

Goldstein, Jan, Ed. Foucault and the Writing of History. Oxford, UK and Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1994.

Papers presented at a conference held at the University of Chicago, Oct. 24-26, 1991.

Includes: Jan Goldstein, "Introduction"; David M. Halperin, "Historicizing the Subject of Desire: Sexual Preferences and Erotic Identites in the Pseudo-Lucianic Erotes."; David Cohen and Richard Saller, "Foucault on Sexuality in Greco-Roman Antiquity"; Arnold I. Davidson, "Ethics as Ascetics: Foucault, the History of Ethics, and Ancient Thought"; Carla Hesse, "Kant, Foucault, and Three Women"; Jan Goldstein, "Foucault and the Post-Revolutionary Self: The Uses of Cousinian Pedagogy in Nineteenth-Century France"; John E. Toews, "Foucault and the Freudian Subject: Archaeology, Genealogy, and the Historicization of Psychoanalysis"; Francois Delaporte, "The History of Medicine according to Foucault"; Robert A. Nye, "Love and Reproductive Biology in Fin-de Siecle France: A Foucauldian Lacuna?"; Roger Chartier, "The Chimera of the Origin: Archaeology, Cultural History, and the French Revolution"; Keith Michael Baker, "A Foucauldian French Revolution?"; Giovanna Procacci, "Governing Poverty: Sources of the Social Question in Nineteenth-Century France"; Laura Engelstein, "Combined Underdevelopment: Discipline and the Law in Imperial and Soviet Russia"; "'Problematization' as a Mode of Reading History."

"Michel Foucault is perhaps the most perplexing and certainly among the most influential of twentieth-century thinkers. Although trained in philosophy, he situated his writings almost entirely in the domain of history - fields that he sought to combine and, in every sense, to 'de-discipline'. Yet Foucault's readers have consistently singled out his philosophy for intensive discussion. This volume is the first to address his influence on, and the potential of his work for, the understanding and the writing of history. It does so critically and accessibly.

"Scholars from the United States, France, and Italy, including historians, sociologists, a classicist and a philosopher, range over the full complement of Foucault's writings, focusing their own comments on four main areas: eros and the family in classical antiquity, the constitution of the self, the history of science and sexuality, and the origins of the liberal state. But true to the thinker who is its subject, this book does not conceive of history divorced from philosophy. It explores how Foucault's understanding of the past related to his epistemology and ethics. And it seeks above all to explain and to assess the subversive and liberating value of, as well as the possible distortions inherent in, Foucault's notion of 'genealogy' - his substitute for history in its traditional guise.

"Many of the authors turn to Foucault's writings for help in elucidating a given cultural configuration. Two adopt a Foucauldian viewpoint to study an event -- the French Revolution -- and arrive at radically different interpretations of it. Others question Foucault's selective use of data -- in relation, for example, to the norms of conduct between husbands and wives in ancient Rome. All in all, the volume offers a series of mind-opening perspectives on Foucault's work, on the past -- and on the present." from the back cover

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Goodheart, Eugene, "Desire and Its Discontents." Partisan Review 55:3 (Summer 1988), 387-403.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Goodman, D., Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Cross Currents 28 (1978), 378-382.

Gordon, Colin, "Nasty Tales." Radical Philosophy 15 (Autumn 1976), 31-32.

A review of I, Pierre Riviere ....

Gordon, Colin, and Jonathan Ree, "The Philosopher in the Classroom: A Report from France." Radical Philosophy 16 (Spring 1977), 2-9.

"In this article we present a survey of GREPH's [Groupe de Recherches sur l'Enseignement Philosophique: research group on philosophy teaching] activities within the French academic and political situation, including an interview with a GREPH representative and a report on a recently published collective study of philosophy essays in schools."

Gordon, Colin, "Birth of the Subject." Radical Philosophy 17 (1977), 15-25.

Discusses The Archaeology of Knowledge, Discipline and Punishment, and The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Gordon, Colin, "Preface, " in Michel Foucault, Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972-1977. Colin Gordon, Ed. New York: Pantheon, 1980. pp. vii-x.

Gordon, Colin, "Episteme Epitomized." Times Literary Supplement (27 March 1981), 332.

Gordon, Colin, "Question, Ethos, Event: Foucault on Kant and Enlightenment." Economy and Society 15:1 (February 1986), 71-87.

Gordon, Colin, "Live Like a Human." New Statesman 115 (6 May 1988), 22-23.

Review of The History of Sexuality, Vol. 3, by Michel Foucault.

Gordon, Colin, "Histoire de la folie: An Unknown Book by Michel Foucault." History of the Human Sciences 3:1

Gordon, Colin, Review of Michel Foucault et ses contemporains, by Didier Eribon, and Dits et ecrits, by Michel Foucault. Times Literary Supplement 4864 (21 June 1996), 9-10.

Gordon, David, Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. Library Journal 113 (15 October 1988), 93.

Gorer, Geoffrey, "French Method and Madness." Observer (23 April 1967), 30.

Review of Madness and Civilization, by Michel Foucault.

Gould, James A., "Explanatory Grounds: Mark vs. Foucault." Dialogos 25: 55 (January 1990)

Greco, Monica. Illness as a Work of Thought: A Foucauldian Perspective of Psychosomatics New York: Routledge, 1998. Routledge Studies in Social and Political Thought.

"This book is a practical application of Foucault's archaeological and genealogical methods to the study of illness and modernity." from the Routledge online catalog

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Greenberg, D., Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Sociology and Social Research 64 (1979), 140-143.

Gregory, Robert, Review of Foucault/Blanchot, by Michel Foucault and Maurice Blanchot. American Book Review 11 (March/April 1989), 13

Grossberg, Lawrence, "Michel Foucault" In Biographical Dictionary of New-Marxism. Robert A. Gorman, Ed. Westport, CT: Greenwood, Press, 1985. pp. 143-146.

Gruber, David F., "Foucault's Critique of the Liberal Individual." Journal of Philosophy 86 (November 1989), 615-621.

Guedon, Jean-Claude, "Michel Foucault: the Knowledge of Power and the Power of Knowledge." Bulletin of the History of Medicine 51 (1977), 245-277.

Guedon, Jean-Claude, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 1 (1978), 105-107.

Gutting, Gary, Ed. The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

"Each volume of this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker.

"Michel Foucault, one of the most important of contemporary French thinkers, exerted a profound influence on philosophy, history, and social theory. Foucault attempted to reveal the historical contingency of ideas that present themselves as necessary truths. He carried out this project in a series of original and strikingly controversial studies on the origins of modern medical and social scientific disciplines. These studies have raised fundamental philosophical questions about the nature of knowledge and its relation to power structures that have become major topics of discussion throughout the humanities and social sciences.

"This volume presents a systematic and comprehensive overview of Foucault's major themes and texts, from his early work on madness through his history of sexuality, and relates his work to significant contemporary movements such as critical theory and feminism. the volume includes the first English translation of George Canguilhem's much cited essays on The Order of Things, and a pseudonymous dictionary entry on Foucault that was probably written by Foucault himself shortly before his death." from the back cover

Includes: Gary Gutting, "Introduction: Michel Foucault: A User's Manual"; Thomas Flynn, "Foucault's Mapping of History"; Gary Gutting, "Foucault and the History of Madness"; George Canguilhem, "The Death of Man, or Exhaustion of the Cogito?" Translated by Catherine Porter; Joseph Rouse, "Power/Knowledge"; Arnold Davidson, "Ethics as Ascetics: Foucault, the History of Ethics, and Ancient Thought"; James Bernauer and Michael Mahon, "The Ethics of Michel Foucault"; Christopher Norris, "'What is Enlightenment?': Kant and Foucault"; Paul Rabinow, "Modern and Countermodern: Ethos and Epoch in Heidegger and Foucault"; David Ingram, "Foucault and Habermas on the Subject of Reason"; Stephen Watson, "'Between Tradition and Oblivion': Foucault, the Complications of Form, the Literature of Reason, and the Aesthetics of Existence"; Jana Sawicki, "Foucault, Feminism, and Questions of Identity"; "Maurice Florence", "Foucault, Michel, 1926-" Translated by Catherine Porter.

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Gutting, Gary. Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Scientific Reason. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Modern European Philosophy series.

"This book is an important introduction to and critical interpretation of the work of the major French thinker Michel Foucault. Through comprehensive and detailed analyses of such important texts as The History of Madness in the Age of Reason, The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, and The Archaeology of Knowledge, Professor Gutting provides a lucid exposition of Foucault's 'archaeological' approach to the history of thought -- a method for uncovering the 'unconscious' structures that set boundaries on the thinking of a given epoch.

"The book also casts Foucault in a new light, relating his work to two major but neglected influences: Gaston Bachelard's philosophy of science and Georges Canguilhem's history of science. This perspective yields a new and valuable understanding of Foucault as a historian and philosopher of science, balancing and complementing the more common view that he was primarily a social critic and theorist." from the back cover

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A | B | C | D | E | F | by Foucault | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

H., L. M., Review of Self/Power/Other, by Romand Coles. Ethics 104 (January 1994), 435

H., S. L., Review of Foucault's Nietzschean Genealogy, by Michael Mahon. Ethics 104 (January 1994), 434.

Haag, Pamela, "Power and the New Cultural History." Radical History Review 63 (Fall 1995), 200-205.

Review of Elizabeth Lunbeck, The Psychiatric Persuasion: Knowledge, Gender and Power in Modern America.

Haber, Honi Fern. Beyond Postmodern Politics: Lyotard, Rorty, Foucault. New York: Routledge, 1994.

"In this book, Honi Haber offers a much-needed analysis of postmodern politics. While continuing to work towards the voicing of the "other," she argues that we must go beyond the insights of postmodernism to arrive at a viable political theory. Postmodernism's political agenda allows the marginalized other to have a voice and to constitute a politics of difference based upon heterogeneity. But Haber argues that postmodern politics denies us the possibility of selves and community--essential elements to any viable political theory.

"Haber calls into question the postmodern dichotomy of totality or difference. She argues that the self--which need not be coherent or unchanging --is always already a social entity. The 'subject' must be understood as a subject-in-community, but any subject is constructed by many different communities.

"The subject whose death has been dictated by postmodern deconstruction is the very subject whose life is necessary for a politics of difference. Haber develops this theory through a detailed examination of postmodern politics as formulated in the work of Lyotard, Rorty, and Foucault. Beyond Postmodern Politics suggests that we must use the concept of subjects-in-community in order to move beyond postmodern politics and arrive at a genuine politics of difference. from the Routledge online catalog

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Habermas, Jurgen, "The Genealogical Writing of History: On Some Aporias in Foucault's Theory of Power." Translated by Gregory Ostrander. Canadian Journal of Political and Social Theory 10:1-2 (1986),

Originally published in Merkur 429 (Fall 1984), 245-253.

Habermas, Jurgen, "Some Questions Concerning the theory of Power: Foucault Again." in Jurgen Habermas, The Philosophical Discourse of Humanity Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1987. p. 266-293.

Hacking, Ian, "Michel Foucault's Immature Science." Nous 13 (1979), 39-51.

Hacking, Ian, Review of Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. Journal of Philosophy 82 (May 1985), 273-277.

Hahn, Roger, Review of The Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. American Journal of Sociology 80 (1975), 1503-1504.

Halperin, David M., Review of Histoire de la sexualite, Vol. 2, L'usage des plaisirs American Journal of Philology 107 (Summer 1986), 274-286.

Halperin, David, "Is There a History of Sexuality?" History and Theory 28:3 (October 1989), 257-274.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Halperin, David M., Bringing out Michel Foucault." Salmagundi 97 (Winter 1993), 69-93.

See also: Jim Miller, "Policing Discourse: A Response to David Halperin."

Halperin, David M. Saint Foucault: Towards a Gay Hagiography. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

"Although there is scarcely more than a passing mention of homosexuality in Michel Foucault's scholarly writing, he became, after dying of AIDS in 1984, a powerful source of both personal and political inspiration to an entire generation of gay activists. At the same time, he acquired mainstream detractors who have systematically distorted and misrepresented this crucial intellectual figure.

"David M. Halperin's Saint Foucault is an uncompromising and impassioned defense of the late French philosopher and historian. Despite Foucault's statement that his work 'had nothing to do with gay liberation,' the book portrays him as a galvanizing thinker whose career as a theorist and activist wil continue to serve as a model for other gay intellectuals. Halperin argues that Foucault's decision to treat sexuality not as a biological or psychological drive but as the product of modern systems of knowledge and power represents a crucial political breakthrough for lesbians and gay men. Foucault's radical vision of homosexuality as a strategic opportunity for self-transformation is shown to have anticipated the new brand of 'queer' politics practiced by contemporary action groups such as ACT UP.

"Pointing to the withering scrutiny of Foucault by such commentators as Camille Paglia, Richard Mohr, Bruce Bawer, Roger Kimball, and biographer James Miller, Saint Foucault forcefully illustrates the continuing personal, professional, and scholarly vulnerability of all gay activists and intellectuals in the age of AIDS." from the back cover

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Halperin, David M., "Forgetting Foucault: Acts, Identities and the History of Sexuality." Representations 63 (Summer 1998), 93-

Harkness, James, Sex, Race and Age." Society 16:6 (1979), 82-86.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Harpham, Geoffrey Galt, "So ... What is Enlightenment?: An Inquisition into Modernity." Critical Inquiry 20 (Spring 1994), 524-556.

Hartsock, Nancy, "Foucault on Power: A Theory for Women?" In Feminism/Postmodernism Linda J. Nicholoson, Ed. New York: Routledge, 1990. pp. 157-175.

Harvard-Watts, John, "Michel Foucault." Times Literary Supplement (31 July 1970), 855.

Hattiangadi, J. N., "Language Philosophy: Hacking and Foucault." Dialogue 17:3 (1978), 513-528.

Hatlen, Burton, "Michel Foucault and the Discourse(s) of English." College English 50:7 (November 1988)

Hayman, Ronald, "Cartography of Discourse?" Encounter 47 (1976), 72-75.

Hekman, Susan, Ed. Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996. Re-reading the Canon.

Includes: Nancy Tuana, "Preface"; Nancy Fraser, "Michel Foucault: A 'Young Conservative'?"; Nancy C. M. Hartsock, "Postmodernism and Political Change: Issues for Feminist Theory"; Judith Butler, "Sexual Inversions"; E. L. McCallum, "Technologies of Truth and the Function of Gender in Foucault"; Linda Martin Alcoff, "Dangerous Pleasures: Foucault and the Politics of Pedophilia"; Honi Fern Haber, "Foucault Pumped: Body Politics and the Muscled Woman"; Jana Sawicki, "Feminism, Foucault, and 'Subjects' of Power and Freedom"; Jon Simons, "Foucault's Mother"; Monique Deveaux, "Feminism and Empowerment: A Critical Reading of Foucault"; Moya Lloyd, "A Feminist Mapping of Foucauldian Politics"; Amy Allen, "Foucault on Power: A Theory for Feminists"; Terry K. Aladjem, "The Philosophers Prism: Foucault, Feminism, and Critique."

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Heller, Scott, "New Foucault Biography Creates Scholarly Stir." Chronicle of Higher Education 39 (30 September 1992), A8+.

Helmling, Steven, Review of Ariel and the Police, by Frank Lentricchia. Kenyon Review 11 (Spring 1989), 151

Herr, Cheryl, "'The Strange Reward of All That Discipline': Yeats and Foucault." In Yeats and Postmodernism. Syracuse University Press, 1991. pp. 146-166.

Hill, R. Kevin, "Foucault's Critique of Heidegger." Philosophy Today 34 (Winter 1990), 324-341.

Hillyard, R., Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Community Development Journal 14 (1979), 163-165.

Hodges, J., and A. Hussein, "Review-discussion of Donzelot." Ideology and Consciousness 5 (1979),

Hodgson, Geoffrey, "All the Eggheads in One Basket." Sunday Times Magazine (16 April 1967), 41, 43-44, 46.

Hollinshead, Keith, "Surveillance of the Worlds of Tourism: Foucault and the Eye-of-power." Tourism Management 20:1 (Febreuary 1999), 7-

Holub, Robert C., "Remembering Foucault." German Quarterly 58 (Spring 1985), 238-256.

Holub, Robert C., "Michel Foucault Among the Germans." In Crossing Borders: Reception Theory, Poststructuralism, Deconstruction. University of Wisconsin Press, 1992. pp. 50-73.

Honneth, Axel. The Critique of Power: Reflective Stages in a Critical Social Theory. Translated by Kenneth Baynes. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1991. Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought.

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Honneth, Axel, "Foucault and Adorno: Two Forms of the Critique of Modernity." In The Fragmented World of the Social. State University of New York, 1995. pp. 121-131.

Horrocks, Chris, and Zoran Jevtic. Introducing Foucault. New York: Totem Books, 1997.

"Michel Foucault's work was described at his death as 'the most important event of thought in our century' As a philosopher, historian, and political activist he most certainly left behind an enduring and influential body of work, but is this acclaim justified? Introducing Foucault places Foucault's work in its turbulent philosophical and political context, and critically explores his mission to expose the links between knowledge and power in the human sciences, their discourse and institutions.

"Chris Horrocks, whose most recent publication if Introducing Baudrillard, explains how Foucault overturned our assumptions about the experience and perception of madness, sexuality and criminality, and the often brutal social practices of confinement, confession and discipline. He describes Foucault's engagement with psychiatry and clinical medicine, his political activism and the transgressive aspects of pleasure and desire which he promoted in his writing. Zoran Jevtic's inspired illustrations give an added dimension to this fascinating introduction to a major 20th century thinker.: from the back cover

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Howard, Richard, Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. Times Literary Supplement (6 October 1961), 653-654.

Howard, Richard, "Our Sense of Where We Are." Nation (5 July 1971), 21-22.

Review of The Order of Things, by Michel Foucault.

Howe, Margaret, "'Open Up a Few Corpses'." Nation (26 January 1974), 117-119.

Hoy, David Couzens, "Taking History Seriously: Foucault, Gadamer, Habermas." Union Seminary Quarterly Review 34 (1979)

Hoy, David Couzens, "Foucault's Slalom." London Review of Books 4 (4-17 November 1982), 18-20.

Review of Michel Foucault, by Dreyfus and Rabinow.

Hoy, David Couzens, "After Foucault." London Review of Books 6 (1-14 November 1982), 7-9.

Review of Michel Foucault, 2nd ed, by Dreyfus and Rabinow.

Hoy, David Couzens, Ed. Foucault: A Critical Reader. Oxford and New York: Basil Blackwell, 1986.

"Michel Foucault's intellectual journeys carried him across many different disciplines and ofter into uncharted lands. His astonishing discoveries and claims have been received with both unbridled enthusiasm and vehement dissent. This collection of essays is the first to bring together major criticisms of Foucault by other writers with their own visions. From the perspective of philosophy, the history of science, intellectual history, sociology, political science, and literary criticism, the distinguished contributors to this bok discuss forthrightly and fairly the difficulties and dangers of Foucault's explorations. Whether they attack or defend him, his texts are closely examined and carefully interpreted. To prevent distortions caused by the controversies Focault intended to provoke, the writers explain his arguments and method clearly, without diminishing the risks Foucault may have foreseen, but that go beyond his own work. The collection gives a complete picture of Foucault's importance as a thinker and social critic who transcended academic boundaries to challenge entrenched, institutionalized models of theoretical rationality and practical normalcy. from the back cover

Includes: David Couzens Hoy, "Introduction"; Ian Hacking, "The Archaeology of Foucault"; Richard Rorty, "Foucault and Epistemology"; Michael Walzer, "The Politics of Michel Foucault"; Charles Taylor, "Foucault on Freedom and Truth"; Jurgen Habermas, "Taking Aim at the Heart of the Present"; Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow, "What is Maturity? Habermas and Foucault on 'What is Enlightenment?'"; David Couzens Hoy, "Power, Repression, Progress: Foucault, Lukes, and the Frankfort School"; Edward W. Said, "Foucault and the Imagination of Power"; Barry Smart, "The Politics of Truth and the Problem of Hegemony"; Martin Jay, "In the Empire of the Gaze: Foucault and the Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-century French Thought"; Mark Poster, "Foucault and the Tyranny of Greece"; Arnold I. Davidson, "Archaeology, Genealogy, Ethics"; Ian Hacking, "Self-Improvement."

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Hoy, David Couzens, "A History of Consciousness: From Kant and Hegel to Derrida and Foucault." History of the Human Sciences 4:2 (June 1991), 261-281.

Huijer, Marli, "The Aesthetics of Existence in the Work of Michel Foucault." Philosophy and Social Criticism 25:2( 1999), 61-

Humphries, Michael L., "Michel Foucault on Writing and the Self in the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius and Confessions of St. Augustine" Arethusa 30:1 (Winter 1997), 125-

Hunt, Alan, and Gary Wickham. Foucault and Law: Towards a Sociology of Law as Governance. London and Boulder, CO: Pluto Press, 1994. Law and Social Theory.

Hunt, Lynn, "The Revenge of the Subject/The Return of Experience." Salmagundi 97 (Winter 1993), 45-53.

Huppert, George, "Divenatio et erudtitio: Thoughts on Foucault." History and Thought 13:3 (1974), 191-207.

Hussain, Athar, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault." Sociological Review 26 (1978), 932-939.

Hutton, Patrick H., Review essay on The Foucault Phenomenon. Historical Reflections 17:1 (Winter 1991)

Huxley, Francis, "Prisoners of Thought." Guardian Weekly (18 December 1977), 18.

Ibde, D., Review of The Foucault Reader, Paul Rabinow, Ed. Cross Currents 35 (Spring 1985), 124-125.

Ignatieff, Michael, "State, Civil Society and Total Institutions: A Critique of Recent Social Histories of Punishment" in Michael Tonry and Norval Morris, Eds., Crime and Justice: Annual Review of Research Vol. 3. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981. pp. 153-192.

Reprinted in Stanley Cohen and Andrew Scull, Eds, Social Control and the State New York: St. Martin's Press, 1982; pp. 75-105.

Ignatieff, Michael, Review of Histoire de la sexualite, Vol. 2, L'usage de plaisirs, and Vol. 3, Le souci de soi, by Michel Foucault. Times Literary Supplement 4252 (28 September 1984), 1071-1072.

Ihde, Don, Review of The Foucault Reader, by Michel Foucault. Cross Currents 52:4 (1985), 460-466.

Isenberg, Bo, "Habermas on Foucault: Critical Remarks." Acta Sociologica 34:4 (1991), 299-308.

Jacoby, R., "The Jargon of the Discourse." Humanities in Society 2 (19--), 149-152.

Jay, Martin. The Limits of Limit-experience: Bataille and Foucault. Berkeley, CA: Center for German and European Studies, University of California, 1993. Working Paper.

Jay, Martin, "From the Empire of the Gaze to the Society of the Spectacle." In Downcast Eyes Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993. pp. 381-434.

Jay, Martin, "Can All Horizons be Fused?" Intellectual History Newsletter 20 (1998)

From a roundtable on "Foucault and Historical Materialism." See also the contributions by Joseph G. Fracchia and Joan Cocks.

Johnson, J.Scott, "Reading Nietzsche and Foucault: A Hermeneutics of Suspicion?" American Political Science Review 85 (June 1991), 581-584.

Johnston, John, "Discourse as Event: Foucault, Writing, and Literature." MLN 105 (September 1990), 800-818.

Jones, Colin, and Roy Porter, Eds Reassessing Foucault: Power, Medicine and the Body London: Routledge, 1994. Studies in the Social History of Medicine.

"Though Foucault is now widely taught in universities, his writings are notoriously difficult. Reassessing Foucault critically examines the implications of his work for students and researchers in a wide range of areas in the social and human sciences.

"Focusing on the social history of medicine, successive chapters deal with Foucalut's historiographical, methodological and philosophical writings, his ideas about prisons, hospitals, madness and disease, and his thinking about the body. They engage with principal aspects of his thought and its relevance, and suggest ways in which Foucault's influence will continue to dominate cultureal history and the social sciences." from the back cover of the paperback edition

Contents: Colin Jones and Roy Porter, "Introduction"; David Armstrong, "Bodies of Knowledge/Knowledge of Bodies"; Thomas Osborne, "On Anti-Medicine and Clinical Reason"; Nikolas Rose, "Medicine, History and the Present"; Sarah Nettleton, "Inventing Mouths: Disciplinary Power and Dentistry"; Randall McGowen, "Power and Humanity, or Foucault Among the Historians"; Felix Driver, "Bodies in Space: Foucault's Account of Disciplinary Power"; Stephen Watson, "Applying Foucault: Some Problems Encountered in the Application of Foucault's Methods to the History of Medicine in Prisons"; Dieter Freundlieb, "Foucault's Theory of Discourse and Human Agency"; Martin Dinges, "The Reception of Michel Foucault's Ideas on Social Discipline, Mental Asylums, Hospitals and the Medical Profession in German Historiography"; Select Bibliography.

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Kamiya, Gary, Review of The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller. Artforum 31 (March 1993), 13.

Kanner, George, "Thinking About Jail." Harvard Civil Rights/Civil Liberties Law Review 13 (1978), 573-586.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Kaplan, Donald W., Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Village Voice (22 November 1973), 29, 31.

Kaplan,Martha, "Panopticon in Poona: An Essay on Foucault and Colonialism." Cultural Anthropology 10 (February 1995), 85-98.

Kaplan, Roger, "Jail and Society." Commentary 65:5 (1978), 82-86.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Katz, Stephen, Review of Discipling Foucault: Feminism, Power, and the Body, Jana Sawicki. History of the Human Sciences 6:2 (May 1993), 139-140.

Keat, Russell, "The Human Body in Theory: Reich, Foucault and the Repressive Hypothesis." Radical Philosophy 42 (Winter/Spring 1986), 24-32.

Keating, Craig, "Reflections on the Revolution in Iran: Foucault on Resistance." Journal of European Studies 26:106, pt. 2 (June 1997), 181-

Keeley, James F., "Toward a Foucauldian Analysis of International Regimes." International Organization 44 (Winter 1990), 83-105.

Kelly, Michael, Ed. Critique and Power: Recasting the Foucault/Habermas Debate. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1994. Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought.

Contents: Michael Kelly, "Introduction". Part I. Michel Foucault, "Two Lectures"; Jurgen Habermas, "The Critique of Reason as an Unmasking of the Human Sciences: Michel Foucault"; Michel Foucault, "Critical Theory/Intellectual History"; Michel Foucault, "The Art of Telling the Truth"; Jurgen Habermas, "Taking Aim at the Heart of the Present: On Foucault's Lecture on Kant's What Is Enlightenment?" Part II. Axel Honneth, "Foucault's Theory of Society: A Systems-Theoretic Dissolution of the Dialectic of Enlightenment"; Nancy Fraser, "Michel Foucault: A 'Young Conservative'?"; Richard Bernstein, "Foucault: Critique as a Philosophic Ethos"; Thomas McCarthy, "The Critique of Impure Reason: Foucault and the Frankfurt School"; James Schmidt and Thomas E. Wartenberg, "Foucault's Enlightenment: Critique, Revolution, and the Fashioning of the Self"; Gilles Deleuze, "Foldings, or the Inside of Thought (Subjectivation)"; Jana Sawicki, "Foucault and Feminism: A Critical Reappraisal"; Michael Kelly, "Foucault, Habermas, and the Self-Referentiality of Critique."

To order the hardcover edition of Critique and Power: Recasting the Foucault/Habermas Debate, go to:
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Kemp, Peter, Review of Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. History and Theory 23:1 (1984), 84-105.

Kendall, Gavin, and Gary Wickham Using Foucault's Methods Sage Publications, 1999. Introducing Qualitative Methods.

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Kendrick, Walter, Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. Voice Literary Supplement 103 (10 March 19932), 10

Kennedy, Deveraux, "Michel Foucault." Theory and Society 8 (1979), 269-290.

Kent, Christopher A., "Michel Foucault: Doing History, or Undoing It?" Canadian Journal of History 21 (December 1986), 371-395.

Kermode, Frank, Review of The Archaeology of Knowledge, Michel Foucault. New York Review of Books (May 1973), 37.

Kimmel, Michael S., Review of The History of Sexuality, vol. 3. Psychology Today 21 (October 1987), 68-69.

Kirk, David, "Foucault and the Limits of Corporeal Regulation: The Emergence, Consolidation and Decline of School Medical Inspection and Physical Training in Australia, 1909-1930. International Journal of the History ofSport 13:2 (Aug 1996), 114-

Kogler, Hans-Herbert. The Power of Dialogue: Critical Hermeneutics after Gadamer and Foucault. Translated by Paul Hendrickson. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1996.

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Koh, Jae-Kyung, D. H. Lawrence, and Michel Foucualt, "A Poetics of Historical Vision." Neophilologus 83:2 (April 1999), 169-

Koshar, Rudy, "Foucault and Social History: Comments on Combined Underdevelopment." American Historical Review 98 (April 1993), 354-363.

See: Laura Engelstein, "Combined Underdevelopment: Discipline and the Law in Imperial and Societ Russia."

Krips, Henry, "Power and Resistence." Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20:2 (June 1990), 170-182.

Krips,Henry, "The Self Unmade: A Meditation on Volume 1 of Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality." In The Judgement of Paris. Allen and Unwin, 1992. pp. 63-73.

Kupers, Terry A., Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Science and Society 39 (1975), 235-238.

Kurzweil, Edith, "Michel Foucault: Ending the Era of Man." Theory and Society 4 (1977), 395-420.

Kurzweil, Edith, "Law and Disorder." Partisan Review 44 (1977), 293-297.

Kurzweil, Edith, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Theory and Society 8 (1979), 422-425.

Kurzweil, Edith, "Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality as Interpreted by Feminists and Marxists." Social Research 53:4 (Winter 1986), 647-663.

Kurzweil, Edith, Review of Foucault, by Gilles Deleuze. Contemporary Sociology 18 (May 1989), 458

Kusch, Martin. Foucault's Strata and Fields: An Investigation into Archaeological and Genealogical Science Studies. Boston: Kluwer, 1991. Synthese Library, vol. 218.

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Lacombe, Dany, "Reforming Foucault: A Critique of the Social Control Thesis." British Journal of Sociology 47:2 (June 1996), 332-352.

La Fountain, Marc, "Foucault and Dr. Ruth." Critical Studies in Mass Communication 6:2 (June 1989), 123-137.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

La Grand,Eva, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Structuralist Review 1:3 (1979), 104-106.

Laing, R. D., "Sanity and 'Madness' --1: The Invention of Madness." New Statesman (16 June 1967), 843.

Review of Madness and Civilization, by Michel Foucault.

Lalonde, Marc P., "Power/Knowledge andLiberation: Foucault as a Parabolic Thinker." Journal of the American Academy of Religion 61 (Spring 1993), 81-100.

Lamb, Andrew W., "Freedom, the Self, and Ethical Practice According to Michel Foucault." International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (December 1995), 449-467.

Lanigan, Richard L. The Human Science of Communicology: A Phenomenology of Discourse in Foucault and Merleau-Ponty. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1992.

To order the hardcover edition of The Human Science of Communicology , go to:

Lanigan, Richard L., "The Algebra of History: Merleau-Ponty and Foucault on the Rhetoric of the Person." In The Critical Turn: Rhetoric and Philosophy in Postmodern Discourse. Southern Illinois University Press, 1993. pp. 140-174.

Larmour, David H. J., Paul Allen Miller, and Charles Platter Eds. Rethinking Sexuality: Foucault and Classical Antiquity. Princeton University Press, 1997.

Includes: David H. Larmour, Paul Allen Miller and Charles Platter, "Situating The History of Sexuality"; Joel Black, "Taking the Sex Out of Sexuality: Foucault's Failed History"; Alain Vizier, "Incipit Philosophia"; Page duBois, "The Subject in Antiquity after Foucault"; Jeffrey S. Carnes, "This Myth Which Is Not One: Construction of Discourse in Plato's Symposium"; Amy Richlin, "Foucault's History of Sexuality: A Useful Theory for Women?"; Paul Allen Miller, "Catullan Consciousness, the 'Care of the Self,' and the Force of the Negative in History"; Daniel B. McGlathery, "Reversals of Platonic Love in Petronius' Satyricon"; Lin Foxhall, "Dislocating Masculinity."

Larson, James L., Review of The Order of Things, Michel Foucault. Isis 64 (1973), 246-247.

Lasch, Christopher, Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. New York Times Book Review (24 February 1974), 6.

Lasch, Christopher, "Life in the Therapeutic State." New York Review of Books (12 June 1980), 24-32.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

Lash, S., "Genealogy and the Body: Foucault/Deleuze/Nietzsche." Theory, Culture & Society 14:1 (1985),

Lash, Scott, Review of Michel Foucault, by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain. Sociology 19 (May 1985), 305-307.

Lattas, Andrew, Review of Michel Foucault and the Subversion of Intellect, by Karlis Racevskis.

Lavers, Annette, "Man, Meaning, and Subject: A Current Reappraisal." Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 1:3 (1970), 44-49.

Leach, Edmund, "Imprisoned by Madmen." Listener (8 June 1967), 752-753.

Review of Madness and Civilization, by Michel Foucault.

Leary, D. E., "Michel Foucault, An Historian of the Sciences humaines." Journal of the History of Behavioral Science 12 (1976), 286-293.

Lecourt, Dominique. Marxism and Epistemology: Bachelard, Canguilhem and Foucault. NLB.

Lefkowitz, Mary R., Review of Histoire de la sexualite, vol. 2, L'usage des plaisirs, and Vol. 3, Le souci de soi, by Michel Foucault. Partisan Review 52:4 (1985), 460-466.

Leland, Dorothy, "On Reading and Writing the World: Foucault's History of Thought." Clio 4 (1975), 225-243.

Review of The Order of Things, by Michel Foucault.

Lemert Charles C., and Garth Gillan, "The New Alternative in Critical Sociology: Foucault's Discursive Analysis." Cultural Hermeneutics 4 (1977), 309-320.

Lemert, Charles C., and Garth Gillan. Michel Foucault: Social Theory and Transgression. New York: Columbia University Press, 1982.

Lentricchia, Frank, "Reading Foucault (Punishment, Labor, Resistance). Part One." Raritan 1:4 (Spring 1982), 5-32.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Lentricchia, Frank, "History or the Abyss: Poststructuralism." In his After the New Criticism pp. 188-210.

Leonard, Jerry, "Foucault and (the Ideology of) Genealogical Legal Theory." In Legal Studies as Cultural Studies. State University of New York Press, 1995. pp. 133-151.

Leventhal, Robert S., Ed. Reading after Foucault: Institutions, Disciplines, and Technologies of the Self in Germany, 1750-1830. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1994.

To order the hardcover edition of Reading After Foucault, go to:

Levin, David, "The Body Politic: The Embodiment of Praxis in Foucault and Habermas." Praxis International 9:1-2 (1989)

Levine, David, "The F-Word: Foucault's History of Sexuality." International Labor and Working-Class History 41 (Spring 1992), 42-48.

Levy, Neil, "The Prehistory of Archaeology: Foucault and Heidegger." The Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology (May 1996)

Levy, Neil, "Foucault's Genealogy of Genealogy." History of the Human Sciences 11:4 (November 1998), 159-

Levy, Silvano, "Foucault on Magritte on Resemblance" Modern Language Review 85:1 (January 1990), 50-56.

Lezra, Jacques, Review of The Passion of Michel Foucault, by James Miller, and Michel Foucault, Didier Eribon. Contemporary Literature 35 (Fall 1994), 593-623.

Lilla, Mark, Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon, and The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller. Times Literary Supplement 4695 (26 March 1993), 3-4.

Livingston, Paisley, and Tobin Siebers, "Glancing Blows: Towards a Panoptical Discipline." Oxford Literary Review 2:3 (1977), 28-34.

Lloyd, Moya, and Andrew Thacker, Eds. The Impact of Michel Foucault on the Social Sciences and Humanities. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1997.

Lochrie, Karma, "Desiring Foucault." Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 27:1 (Winter 1997), 3-16.

Locke, Richard, "In the Cage." New York Times Book Review (26 March 1978), 3.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Looser, Devoney, "Feminist Theory and Foucault: A Bibliographic Essay." Style 26 (Winter 1992), 593-603.

Loudon, J. B., Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Man 9 (1974), 319-320.

Love, Nancy S., "Foucault and Habermas on Disclosure and Democracy." Polity 22:2 (Winter 1989)

Lucas, Colin, "Power and the Panopticon." Times Literary Supplement (26 September 1975), 1090.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Lukacher, N., Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. Choice 29 (January 1992), 758

Luke, Carmen, "Epistemic Rupture and Typography: The Archaeology of Knowledge and The Order of Things Reconsidered." Sociolinguistics 17:2 (1988), 141-155.

Lydon, Mary, "Foucault and Feminism: A Romance of Many Dimensions." In Skirting the Issue Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1995. pp. 216-228.

Lynch, Richard A., "Is Power All There Is? Michel Foucault and the 'Omnipresence' of Power Relations." Philosophy Today 42:1/4 (Spring 1998), 65-

Macey, David. The Lives of Michel Foucault. New York: Pantheon Books, 1994.

"When he died of an AIDS-related condition in 1984, Michel Foucault had become the most influential French philosopher since the end of World War II. His powerful studies of the creation of modern medicine, prisons, psychiatry, and other methods of classification have had a lasting impact on philosophers, historians, critics, and novelists the world over. But as public as he was in his militant campaigns on behalf of prisoners, dissidents, and homosexuals, he shrouded his personal life in mystery.

"In the Lives of Michel Foucault -- written with the full cooperation of Daniel Defert, Foucault's former lover -- David Macey gives the richest account to date of Foucault's life and work, informed as it is by the complex issues arising from his writings." from the back cover of the paperback

MacIntyre, Alisdair, "Miller's Foucault, Foucault's Foucault." Salmagundi , 97 (1993), 54-60.

Madigan, Stephen Patrick, "The Application of Michel Foucault's Philosophy in the Problem Externatlizing Discourse of Michael White." Journal of Family Therapy 14:3 (August 1992), 265-279.

Mahon, Michael. Foucault's Nietzschean Genealogy: Truth, Power, and the Subject. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992. SUNY Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy.

"This is the first full-length study of the impact of Friedrich Nietzsche's writings on the thought of French philosopher Michel Foucault. Focusing on the notion of genealogy in the thought of both Nietzsche and Foucault, the author explores the three genealogical axes -- truth, power, and the subject -- as they gradually emerge in Foucault's writings. This complex of axes into which Foucault was drawn especially as a result of his early history of madness, called forth his explicit adoption of a Nietzschean approach to his future work.

"By interpreting Foucault's Histoire de la folie in the light of Nietzsche's genealogy of tragedy, Mahon shows how the moral problematization of madness in history provides the historical conditions from which the three axes emerge. After tracing the gradual emergence of the three axes through Foucault's writings of the remainder of the 1960s, especially Les Mots et les choses, Mahon turns to Foucault's explicit methodological statements and his notion of genealogy and offers a reading of Foucault's L'archeologie du savoir, arguing that there is no chasm between Foucault's archaeological writings and his genealogies.

"The work concludes with an analysis of Foucault's final writings on the genealogy of modern subjectivity and an examination of how truth, power, and the subject operate for the modern psychoanalytic subject of desire." from the back cover

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Mainetti, Jose Alberto, Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 2 (1977), 77-83.

Major-Poetzl, Pamela. Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Western Culture: Towards a New Science of History. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1983.

"Michel Foucault's controversial 'archaeologies' are already recognized as a radical new approach to the history of the human sciences. In this challenging study, Pamela Major-Poetzl demonstrates that Foucault's archaeological methodology points the way to an equally radical effort to create a 'new science' of history.

"Beginning with Foucault's Archaeology of Knowledge (1969), Major-Poetzl argues that 'archaeology' is an attempt to separate historical and philosophical analysis from the evolutionary model of nineteenth-century biology and establish a new form of social thought based on principles similar to those of field theory in twentieth-century physics. Major-Poetzl summarizes the history of field-theory physics and isolates concepts in relativity theory and quantium mechanics that are life those Foucault emplys in his 'archaeologies.' These concepts include the substitution of fields for forces and substances, the redefinition of time and space, the discontinuous nature of change, the dissolution of fixed subjects and objects of knowledge, and the prevalence of symmetrical relationships.

"Major-Poetzl examines a number of Foucault's articles and interviews in order to present Foucault's own explanation of his purposes, his interpretation of major cultural figures (including Nietzsche, Marx, and Freud), and his assessment of the relation between power and knowledge. She also discusses Gaston Bachelard's historical epistemology and Georges Canguilhem's history of science, as well as Thomas Kuhn's concept of paradigms. Ferdinand de Saussure's structural linguistics, and Foucault's literary essays, in an effort to suggest that Foucault's work is part of a larger cultural paradigm that spans contemporary scientific, social, and literary thought.

"The concluding sections of the book deal specifically with four of Foucault's publications. Mental Illness and Psychology (1954), Madness and Civilization (1961), The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception (1963), and The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Science (1966). Major-Poetzl shows that the first three works analyze different percpetions of the irrational and the pathological from the Renaissance to the present and provide an implicit critique of our current understanding of these negative classifications. She then argues that Foucault's conception of order and change in The Order of Things suggest that 'archaeology.' like modern physics, is an abstract and highly formalized system of knowledge which imposes order on a more fundamental experience of disorder and throws into doubt the traditional categories of scientific and social thought."

Malin, I., Death and the Labyrinth: The World of Raymond Roussel, Michel Foucault. Review of Contemporary Fiction 7 (Fall 1987), 253.

Mall, James P., "Foucault as Literary Critic." In French Literary Criticism Philip Crant, Ed. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1977. French Literature Series, IV. pp. 197-204.

Mall, James P. Review of Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (1979), 369-372.

Marcus, Steven, "In Praise of Folly." New York Review of Books (3 November 1966), 6

Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault.

Marin, Richard T., Review of The History of Sexuality, Vol. 3, The Care of the Self, by Michel Foucault, and Foucault, David Couzens Hoy, Ed. Commentary 84 (July 1987), 63-65.

Margolis, Joseph Z., Review of This is Not a Pipe, by Michel Foucault. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (Winter 1984), 224-225.

Marsden, Richard The Nature of Capital: Marx After Foucault New York: Routledge, 1999. Routledge Studies in Social and Political Thought, 20.

To order the hardcover edition of The Nature of Capital, go to:

Marshall, James, "An Anti-Foundationalist Approach to Discipline and Authority." Discourse 7:2 (April 1987), 1-20.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Marshall, James. Michel Foucault: Personal Autonomy and Education. Boston: Kluwer, 1996. Philosophy and Eduation, vol. 7.

To order the hardcover edition of Michel Foucault: Personal Autonomy and Education, go to:

Martin, Luther H., Huck Gutman, and Patrick H. Hutton, Eds. Technologies of the Self: A Seminar with Michel Foucault. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988.

To order the paperback edition of Technologies of the Self, go to:

Maslan, Mark, "Foucault and Pragmatism." Raritan 7 (Winter 1988), 94-114.

Matza, David, Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. American Sociological Review 31 (1966), 551-552.

May, Todd. Between Genealogy and Epistemology: Psychology, Politics, and Knowledge in the Thought of Michel Foucault. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993.

To order the hardcover edition of Between Genealogy and Epistemology, go to:

May, Todd, Review of Michel Foucault and the Politics of Freedom, by Thomas L. Dumm. Ethics 107 (April 1997), 550

Maynard, Mary, Review of Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. British Journal of Sociology 36 (March 1985), 148-149.

Maynard, Mary, Review of Michel Foucault, by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain, and Michel Foucault, by Barry Smart. Sociological Review 34 (May 1986), 437-440.

Mayne, Richard, Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. London Review of Books 14 (10 September 1992), 14

McCarthy, Thomas A., "The Critique of Impure Reason: Foucault and the Frankfort School." Political Theory 18 (August 1990), 437-469.

McConnell, Frank, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. New Republic 178 (1 April 1978), 32-34.

McDonald, Bridget, Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. MLN 104 (September 1989), 945-949.

McDonell, Donald J., "On Foucault's Philosophical Method." Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (1977), 537-553.

McEvilley, Thomas, Review of This is Not a Pipe, by Michel Foucault. Artforum 22 (October 1983), 68.

McGee, Glenn, "The Relevance of Foucault to Whiteheadian Environmental Ethics." Environmental Ethics 16 (Winter 1994), 419-424.

McGowen, Randall, Review of Michel Foucault and the Subversion of Intellect, by Karlis Racevskis, and Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. Comparative Literature 38 (Spring 1986), 181-186.

McHoul, A. W., and Wendy Grace. A Foucault Primer: Discourse, Power, and the Subject. New York: New York University Press, 1997.

"In such seminal works as Madness and Civilization, Discipline and Punish, and The History of Sexuality, the late philosopher Michel Foucault explored what our politics, our sexuality, our societal conventions, and our changing notions of truth told us about ourselves. In the process, foucault garnered a reputation a one of the preeminent philosophers of the latter half of teh twentieth century, and has served as a primary influence on successive generations of philosophers and cultural critics.

"With A Foucault Primer, Alec McHoul and Wendy Grace bring Foucault's work into focus for the uninitiated. Written in crisp and concise prose, A Foucault Primer explicates the three central concepts of Foucauldian theory -- discourse, power, and the subject -- and suggests that Foucault has much yet to contribute to contemporary debate." from the back cover

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McHugh, Patrick, "Dialectics, Subjectivity and Foucault's Ethos of Modernity." boundary 2 16 (Winter/Spring 1989), 91-108.

McIntyre, Alasdair C., "Miller's Foucault, Foucault's Foucault." Salmagundi 97 (Winter 1993), 54-60.

McKerrow, Raymie E., Review of Michel Foucault, by John Rajchman. Quarterly Journal of Speech 75 (May 1989), 226-227.

McKinley, Alan, and Ken Starkey, Eds. Foucault, Management and Organization Theory: From Panopticon to Technologies of Self. Sage Publications, 1998.

To order the hardcover edition of Foucault, Management and Organization Theory, go to:
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McLaren, Margaret A., "Foucault and the Subject of Feminism." Social Theory and Practice 23:1 (Spring 1997), 109-

McMullen, Roy, "Michel Foucault." Horizon 11 (Autumn 1969), 36-39.

McNay, Lois. Foucault and Feminism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1992. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1993

"This is the most sustained discussion yet of Foucauldian theory's implications for feminist thought and practice.

"Lois McNay analyzes Michel Foucault's final works, The Use of Pleasure and The Care of the Self, and various interviews and articles, to explore his shift from technologies of power to technologies of the self. Revealing the presence of modernist themes and concepts in his last books, she argues that Foucault should not automatically be categorized as a postmodern thinker. Her work makes major contributions to the study of feminism, philosophy, and cultural studies." from the back cover of the U.S. paperback edition

To order the hardcover edition of Foucault and Feminism, go to:
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McNay, Lois. Foucault: A Critical Introduction. New York: Continuum, 1994.

"Foucault: A Critical Introduction offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the work of one of the twentieth century's most influential thinkers. Unlike most books on Foucault, this book offers an assessment of all Foucault's work, including his final writings on governmentality and the self. McNay argues that the later work initiates an important shift in his intellectual concerns which alters any retrospective reading of his writings as a whole.

"Throughout, McNay is concerned to assess the normative and political implications of Foucault's social criticism. She goes beyond the level of many commentators to look at the values from which Foucault's work springs, and reveals the implicit assumptions underlying his social critique.

"McNay also discusses Foucault's position in the modernity/postmodernity debate, his own ambivalence toward Enlightenment thought and his place in recent developments in feminist and cultural theory.

"The result is an invaluable book which clearly outlines the central themes of Foucault's work, while offering a fresh appraisal of his thought." from the dust jacket

McNeil, Will, "Care for the Self: Ordinary Ethics in Heidegger and Foucault." Philosophy Today 42:1/4 (Spring 1998), 53-

McWhorter, Ladelle, "Culture of Nature?: The Function of the Term 'Body' in the Work of Michel Foucault." Journal of Philosophy 86:11 (November 1989), 608-614.

McWhorter, Ladelle, "The Event of Truth: Foucault's Response to Structuralism." Philosophy Today 38 (Summer 1994), 159-166.

Megill, Allan, "Foucault, Structuralism and the Ends of History." Journal of Modern History 51 (1979), 451-503.

Megill, Allan, "Recent Writing on Michel Foucault." Journal of Modern History 56 (September 1984), 499-511.

Review of Michel Foucault and the Subversion of Intellect, by Karlis Racevskis; Michel Foucault, by Charles C. Lemert and Garth Gillian; Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow; and Michel Foucault: An Annotated Bibliography, by Michael Clark.

Megill, Allan, "The Reception of Foucault by Historians." Journal of the History of Ideas 48 (January/March 1987), 117-141.

Megill, Allan, "Foucault, Ambiguity, and the Rhetoric of Historiography." History of the Human Sciences 3:3 (1990), 343-363.

Meisel, Perry, "What Foucault Knows." Salmagundi 44-45 (1979), 235-241.

Merquior, J. G. Foucault London: Fontana, 1985.

Reprint edition: Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987.

"A volume in the Modern Masters series first published by Fontana in the United Kingdom, this concise critical study of Foucault provides a new view of a seminal thinker and his work. In his meticulous, witty, and elegant book, J. G. Merquior examines Foucault's work on madness, sexuality, and power and offers a provocative assessment of Foucault as a 'neo-anarchist.' The author brings to his subject an astonishing breadth of scholarship--comparable to that of Foucault himself--exploring Foucault's work with a deft and economical erudition in a wide range of fields. Thus the reader finds Foucault's thought illuminated by references to the work of Panofsky, Cassirer, Marcuse, Elias, Kantorowicz, Polanyi, Dihle, and others.

Contents: 1. The Historian of the Present. 2. The Great Confinement, or du cote de la folie. 3. An Archaeology of the Human Sciences. 4. From the Prose of the World to the Death of Man. 5. The "Archeaology" Appraised. 6. The Ironic Archive. 7. Charting Carceral Society. 8. Foucault's "Cratology": His Theory of Power. 9. Politics of the Body, Techniques of the Soul: Foucault's History of Sexuality. 10. Portrait of the Neo-Anarchist.

To order the paperback edition of Foucault, go to:

Merry, Sally Engle, "Pluralizing Paradigms: from Gluckman to Foucault." Polar 22:1 (May 1999), 115-

Meynell, Hugo, "On Knowledge, Power and Michel Foucault." Heythrop Journal 30:4 (October 1989)

Middleton, Sue. Disciplining Sexuality: Foucault, Life Histories, and Education. New York: Teachers College Press, 1998. Athene Series.

To order the hardcover edition of Disciplining Sexuality, go to:

Midelfort, H. C. Erik, "Madness and Civilization in Early Modern Europe: A Reappraisal of Michel Foucault." In After the Reformation: Essays in Honor of J. H. Hexter. Barbara C. Malament, Ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1980. pp. 247-265.

Miel, Jan, "Ideas or Epistemes: Hazard versus Foucault." Yale French Studies 49 (1973), 231-245.

Miguel-Alfonso, Ricardo, and Silvia Caporale-Bizzini, Eds. Reconstructing Foucault: Essays in the Wake of the 80s. Editions Rodopi, 1994.

To order the hardcover edition of Reconstructing Foucault, go to:

Miller, James, "Carnivals of Atrocity: Foucault, Nietzsche, Cruelty." Political Theory 18 (August 1990), 470-491.

Miller, James, "Foucault: The Secrets of a Man." Salmagundi 88/89 (Fall 1990/Winter 1991), 311-332.

Miller, James, "Michel Foucault: The Heart Laid Bare." Grand Street 10:3 (1991), 53-64.

Miller, James. The Passion of Michel Foucault. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.

"This book is not a biography, though in outline it follows the chronology of Michel Foucault's life; nor is it a comprehensive survey of his works, although it does offer an interpretation of a great many of his texts. It is, rather, a narrative account of one man's lifelong struggle to honor Nietzsche's gnomic injunction, 'to become what one is.'

"Through a blend of anecdote and exegenesis, I have approached Foucault's writing as if it expressed a powerful desire to realize a certain form of life, and his life as if it embodied a sustained and partially successful effort to turn this desire into a reality. In the spirit of an investigative journalist, I have gathered information about various aspects of Foucault's life that have been hitherto undocumented and, therefore, largely unexamined. In the spirit of an intellectual historian, I have sketched the broader cultural and social context within which this life unfolded. And in the spirit of a literary critic, I have highlighted a handful of recurrent fantasies and imaginative obsessions that gave a characteristic color and mood to both Foucault's composed texts and everyday life. My aim has been to conjure up 'neither the pure grammatical subject nor the deep psychological subject,' as Foucault himself once put it, 'but rather the one who says "I" in the works, the letters, the drafts, the sketches, the personal secrets.'" from the Preface

Miller, James, "Policing Discourse: A Response to David Halperin." Salmagundi 97 (Winter 1992), 94-99.

See: David M. Halperin, "Bringing out Michel Foucault."

Miller, James, "Foucault's Politics in Biographical Perspective." Salmagundi 97 (Winter 1993), 30-44.

Miller, Stephen, "The Future of Disinterest and Foucault's Regime of Truth." Partisan Review 64:1 (Winter 1997), 28-36.

Miller, Toby. The Well-Tempered Self: Citizenship, Culture, and the Postmodern Subject. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.

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Minson, Jeff, "Strategies for Socialists? Foucault's Conception of Power." Economy and Society 9:1 (February 1980), 1-43.

"Abstract: The article draws out the relevance of Michel Foucault's work on forms of 'social' regulation and training to a socialist audience. In an introduction to his conception of power, Marxist theory is implicated in Foucault's criticisms of classical conceptions of power-as-sovereignty. Some untenable 'Nietzschean' ingredients of his position, particularly his preoccupation with 'power' and 'subjectification' are distinguished from a more rewarding emphasis on the construction of specific categories of social agent and their attributes; and on the formation of the politically ambiguous domain of 'social' policies and programmes. These emphases render problematic current socialist conceptions of 'socialization' and 'social' revolution."

Moi, Toril, Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. French Studies 44 (July 1990), 370-371.

Montag, Warren, "'The Soul is the Prison of the Body': Althusser and Foucault, 1970-1975." Yale French Studies 88 (1995), 53-77.

Montefiore, Alan, Review of Michel Foucault, by Didier Eribon. Journal of Modern History 66 (September 1994), 629-631.

Moore, Stephen D. Poststructuralism and the New Testament: Derrida and Foucault at the Foot of the Cross. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1994.

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Morris, Meaghan, and Paul Patton, Eds. Michel Foucault: Power, Truth, Strategy. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2.

Includes: Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, "Preface"; Francois Chatelet, "Recit"; Michel Foucault, "Truth and Power"; Michel Foucault, "Powers and Strategies"; Michel Foucault, "Power and Norm: Notes"; Michel Foucault, "Interview with Lucette Finas"; Michel Foucault, "The Life of Infamous Men"; Bibliography, "Meaghan Morris, "Fiche Technique"; Paul Patton, "Of Power and Prisons"; Meaghan Morris, "The Pirate's Fiancee"; Paul Foss, "The Lottery of Life."

Morris, Meaghan, "The Pirates Fiancee Feminists and Philosophers, or maybe it'll happen tonight." In Michel Foucault: Power Truth Strategy Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp.148-68.

Morris, Meaghan, and Paul Patton, "Preface." In Michel Foucault: Power Truth Strategy Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp. 7-10.

Morris, Phyllis S., "Self-Creating Selves: Sartre and Foucault." American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (Autumn 1996, 537-549.

Moss, Jeremy. The Later Foucault: Politics and Philosophy Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1998.

"What makes Michel Foucault's work continue to be of central importance in current debates in sociology, political science, and philosophy? Why do we still read him as a guide to contemporary social and cultural life? The Later Foucault argues that the key to undertstanding Foucault is his political thought. It is this that began to be expressed clearly in his last writings and that pulled together his earlier interests in power, agency, and subjectivity. The book brings together a distinguished array of Foucault scholars and commentators on politics to bring out the significance of Foucault's last writings. It examines such key issues as the question of Foucault and human rights; his relationship to ethical thought, power, and freedom, his relationship to feminism, and comparisons of his work with Levinas and Rawls. The result is a probing text that casts Foucault's work in a new light." from the Sage catalog

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Mullin, Redmond, Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Heythrop Journal 19 (1978), 426-427.

Mumby, Dennis K., "Two Discourses on Communication, Power, and the Subject: Jurgen Habermas and Michel Foucault." In Constructions of the Self. George Levine, Ed. Rutgers University Press, 1992. pp. 81-104.

Mundwiler, Leslie, "Williams, Breton, Marcuse, Foucault." Open Letter Second series. 5 (Summer 1973), 54-68.

Murphy, John W., "Foucault's Ground of History." International Philosophical Quarterly 24 (June 1984), 189-196.

Murphy, W. T., Review of Michel Foucault and the Politics of Freedom, by Thomas L. Dumm. British Journal of Sociology 48 (March 1997), 152-153.

Nash, Kate, "The Feminist Production of Knowledge: Is Deconstruction a Practice for Women?" Feminist Review 47 (Summer 1994), 65-77

Nealon, Jeffrey T., "Between Emergence and Possibility: Foucault, Derrida, and Judith Butler on Performative Identity." Philosophy Today 40 (Fall 1996), 430-439.

Nehamas, Alexander, "What an Author Is." Journal of Philosophy 83 (November 1986), 685-692.

Nehamas, Alexander, "Subject and Abject." New Republic 208 (15 February 1993), 27-36.

Nehamas, Alexander. The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections from Plato to Foucault. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998. Sather Classical Lectures, vol. 61.

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Neubauer, John, Ed. Cultural History After Foucault Walter de Gruyter, 1999.

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Nielsen,Kai, "Habermas and Foucault: How to Carry Out the Enlightenment Project." Journal of Value Inquiry 31:1 (March 1997)

Nikolinakos, Derek D., "Foucault's Ethical Quandary." Telos 83 (Spring 1990), 123-140.

Nilson, Herman. Michel Foucault and the Games of Truth London: Macmillan Press, 1998.

"The book emphasises the affinity between Foucault's and Nietzche's thought. Both philosophers tried to give clarity to modernity's arbitrary nature. Following on from Foucault's diagnostic enquiries into a 'History of Sexuality' and Nietzsche's appreciation of ancient culture, Nilson's study shows a practical consequence: the self-stylization of the individual. This aesthetical attitude replaces belief in metaphysical and even scientific meaning, thus leading to a philosophy-of-life. Nilson's book targets all those who wish to give their life an unique form." from the Macmillan online catalog

Contents: Introduction. Part One: Pagan Self-Technologies. The Art of Temperance. A Culture of the Self. Part Two: Foucault's Ethos. The Role of Power. The Project of the Genealogies. Modernity as an Attitude. The Care of the Truth. Technologies of the Self. Aesthetics of Existence. I, Nietzsche. Conclusion.

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Noiriel, Gerard, "Foucault and History: The Lessons of a Disillusion." Journal of Modern History 66 (September 1994), 547-568.

Nola, Robert, "Post-modernism, a French Cultural Chernobyl: Foucault on Power/Knowledge." Inquiry 37 (March 1994), 3-43.

Nola, Robett, Ed. Foucault London and Portland, OR: Frank Cass, 1998.

"Michel Foucault (1926-1984) was one of the most renowned of late twentieth century social philosophers. He covered an enormous range; from sexuality to prisons; from identity to power; from knowledge to politics.

"The essays written for this book range over all of Foucault's work, but their main critical focus is upon objectivity, power and knowledge. The very possibility of a critical stance is a recurring theme in all of Foucault's works and the contributors vary in the ways that they related to his key views on truth and reason in relation to power and government." from the back cover of the paperback edition.

Contents: Robert Nola, "Introduction". Keith Windschuttle, "Foucault as Historian". Joseph Margolis, "Foucault's Problematic". Barry Hindess, "Knowledge and Political Reason. Robert Wicks, "Foucault and the Possibility of Historical Transcendence". Robert Nola, "Knowledge, Discourse, Power and Genealogy in Foucault."

Nordquist, Joan. Michel Foucault: A Bibliography. 2nd ed. Santa Cruz, CA: Reference and Research Services, 1992. Social Theory, no. 27.

The first edition was published in 1986 (Social Theory series, no. 4).

Norris, Christopher, "Versions of Apocalypse: Kant, Derrida, Foucault." In Apolcalypse Theory and the Ends of the World. Blackwell, 1995. pp. 227-249.

O'Brien, Patricia, "Michel Foucault's History of Culture." In The New Cultural History. Lynn Hunt, Ed. 1989.

O'Connell, D., Review of Foucault/Blanchot, by Michel Foucault and Maurice Blanchot. Choice 25 (June 1988), 1561.

O'Farrell, C., "Foucault and the Foucauldians." Economy and Society 11 (1982), 449-459.

O'Farrell, Clare. Foucault: Historian or Philosopher? New York: St. Martin's Press, 1990.

To order the hardcover edition of Foucault: Historian or Philosopher?, go to:

O'Farrell, Clare, Ed. Foucault: The Legacy. Brisbane, Australia: Queensland University of Technology, 1997.

Contents: Clare O'Farrell, "Introduction: Foucault: A View from the Antipodes."

Part One: Literature and History. Peter Cryle, "Sade as a Figure of Radical Modernity: Making-and-Breaking the History of Sexuality"; Edward Scheer, "Foucault/Artaud: The Madness of the Oeuvre"; Anthony Uhlmann, "Eleutheromania: Freedom and Surveillance in Beckett and Foucault"; Shane Wilcox, "The Memoir, the Corpse and the Bad Judge: Foucault and Bataille"; Slobodanka Vladiv-Glover, "The Body and Violence: The Subject of Knowledge in Dostoevksy's The Brothers Karamazov and Foucault's Analytic of Finitude"; Claire Colebrook, "Foucault and New Historicism in Literary Studies."

Part Two: Australian History: Art, Science and Government. Russell Staiff, "History and the Painted Landscape in Mid-Nineteenth Century Australia"; Mary Mackay, "Foucault's 'Statement' and Paradigm Change in Nineteenth Century Australia"; Gavin Kendall, "Governing at a Distance: The Colonisation of Australia"; Geoff Danaher, "Foucault, Ideology and the Social Contract in Australian History."

Part Three: Art, Architecture and Cities. Thomas Wallgren, "Art, Politics and the History of 'Change'"; Andrew McNamara, "A Panoptic Art History? The Dilemma of Context"; Rob Garrett, "'Making Facile Gestures Difficult': Artists, Criticality, and the Politics of Publicness?"; Jean Hiller, "Foucault's Gaze"; John Macarthur, "'Architectural Irregularities': Discourse and Technique in a Foucauldian History of the Picturesque Cottage."

Part Four: Philosophy. Mika Ojakangas, "The Ethics of Singularity in an Era of Complete Nihilism"; Jorge Davila, "An Exegesis of the Text Was ist Aufklarung? Foucault's Intellectual Testament"; Andrew Thacker, "Clutter and Glitter: Foucault and the Writing of History"; Patricia Moynihan, "Foucault, Politics and the Performative"; Michael Janover, "The Subject of Foucault"; Chris Falson, "Foucault, Dialogue and the Other"; Paul Alberts, "Atrocity Mechanics: Is There a Logic to Modern Inhumanity?"; Tony Schirato, "The Disorder of Things: Foucault and Comic Writing"; George Petelin, "Beyond Power/Knowledge, or Towards Erasing the Distinction Between the Discursive and Non-discursive"; Philip Barker, "Foucault's Sublime: E-mail to Postumius Terentianus."

Part Five: Psychoanalysis. David Holmes, "Foucault, Hegel, Psychoanalysis and Anthropologies of Truth"; Tony Thwaites, "Cathexis: Metaphorics of Power."

Part Six: Feminism. Moya Lloyd, "Foucault's 'Care fo the Self': Some Implications for Feminist Politics"; Gail Reekie, "Feminist History After Foucault"; Kylie Stephen, "Poststructuralism, Feminism and the Question of Rape: Rethinking the 'Desexualisation' Politics of Michel Foucault"; Chris Atmore, "Brand News, Using Foucault to Theorise Rape, the Media and Feminist Strategies"; D. H. Jones, "Normalising Equality: Surveillance and the 'Equitable' Public Servant."

Part Seven: Truth, Law and Medicine. Dirk Moore, "The Production of Truth: Body and Soul. Part 1: 'Telling Truths': Truth Telling in the Judicial Process"; Randall Albury, "The Production of Truth: Body and Soul. Part 2: Displaying the Truth of the Body"; Christine Higgins, "Legal Language as Discursive Formation."

Part Eight: The Art of Government. David Burchell, "'Liberalism' and Government: Political Philosophy and the Liberal Art of Rule"; Mitchell Dean, "A Political Ontology"; Tony Bennett, "Culture and Utility: Calculating Culture's Civilising Effect"; J. P. Minson, "What is an Expert?"; Paul Henman, "Computers and Governmentality in Australia's Department of Social Security"; Gary Sigley, "Governing Chinese Bodies: The Significance of Studies in the Concept of Governmentality for the Analysis of Birth Control in China"; Ratnam Alagiah and Michael Gaffikin, "A Foucauldian Genealogy of Income"; John Pratt, "'This is Not a Prison': Foucault, the Panopticon and Pentonville."

Part Nine: Management Studies. Stewart Clegg, "Foucault, Power, Social Theory and the Study of Organizations"; Shayne Grice, "Foucault and Management Studies: Post-Critical Critique?"

Part Ten: Public Relations. P. David Marshall, "Constructing Publics: Foucault's Power/Knowledge Matrix and the Genealogy of Public Relations and Press Agentry"; Elizabeth Logan, "The Role of Public Relations in Empowering Groups and Institutions: A Study"; Judy Motion, "Women Politicians: Media Objects or Political Subjects?"

Part Eleven: Policing the Environment. Ade Peace, "Governing the Environment: The Programs and Politics of Environmental Discourse"; Paul Rutherford, "Policing Nature: Ecology, Natural Science and Biopolitics."

Part Twelve: The "Third World" and Postcolonialism. Parlo Singh, "The Colonial Legacy of Regulating 'Third World' Women as the Alluring 'Other'"; Patricia Stamp, "Pastoral Power: Foucault and the New Imperial Order." Part Thirteen: Education. James Marshall, "Personal Autonomy as an Aim of Education: A Foucauldian Critique"; Denise Meredyth, "Ethics, Technics, Politics: Australian Debates on Competencies and Citizenship"; Bert Wigman, "Competency-based Training: Taylorism Revisited?"; Daphne Meadmore, "'This Slender Technique': Examining Assessment Policy"; Kathleen Warren, "Michel Foucault, Dorothy Heathcote, Drama and Early Chilhood"; Susan Grieshaber, "Reconceptualising Parent and Child Conflict: A Foucauldian Perspective"; Jennifer Gore, "Power Relations in Pedagogy: An Empirical Study Based on Foucauldian Thought"; Jayne Keogh, "Beyond the Panopticon: Accounting for Behavior in Parent-Teacher Communications"; Barbara Grant, "Disciplining Students: The Construction of Student Subjectivities."

Part Fourteen: Health and Nursing. Michael Bartos, "Foucault Had to Die Shamefully"; Alan Petersen, "The New Morality: Public Health and Personal Conduct"; Julianne Cheek and Trudy Rudge, "The Rhetoric of Health Care? Foucault, Health Care Practices and the Docile Body -- 1990s Style"; Elaine Stratford, "Using Foucauldian Ideas to Analyse a Problem Concerning Women and the Environment"; Janet Schmitzer, "The Health of Our Children: A National Efficiency Framework for a Nation"; Stephen Katz, "Foucault and Gerontological Knowledge: The Making of the Aged Body"; Sue Crane, "Action Research in a Nursing Home: Theorising Critical Incidents Arising from Actioin through a Foucauldian View of Institutional Power"; Kim Walker, "Toward a Critical Ontology: Nursing and the Problem of the Modern Subject"; Suzanne Goopy, "Repositioning the Nurse."

Part Fifteen: Marketing Foucault. Clare O'Farrell, "The Name of the Author"; Alec McHoul, "Condensing Foucault."

A | B | C | D | E | F | by Foucault | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

O'Hara, Daniel T., "Michel Foucault and the Fate of Friendship." boundary 2 18 (Spring 1991), 83-103.

O'Hara, Daniel T. Radical Parody: American Culture and Critical Agency after Foucault. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992. Social Foundations of Aesthetic Forms.

Includes: "What Was Foucault?"; "Performing Theory as Cultural Politics: The 'Experience' of Critical Agency in and After Foucault"; "Aesthetic Relations: Michel Foucault and the Fate of Friendship."

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Oldfield, Paul, Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. New Statesman and Society 1 (18 November 1988), 43.

Oldman, David, Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Sociology 9 (1975), 359-360.

Olssen, Mark. Michel Foucault: Materialism and Education. Westport, CT: Bergin and Garvey, 1999. Critical Studies in Education and Culture.

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Ophir, Adi, "Michel Foucault and the Semiotics of the Phenomenal." Dialogue 27:3 (Fall 1988), 387-415.

Discusses The Birth of the Clinic.

Ophir, Adi, "The Semiotics of Power: Reading Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punishment." Manuscrito 12:2 (October 1989), 9-34.

Osborne, Thomas, "Medicine and Epistemology: Michel Foucault and the Liberality of Clinical Reason." History of the Human Sciences 5:2 (May 1992), 63-93.

Owen, David, Review of Technologies of the Self: A Seminar with Michel Foucault, Luther H. Martin, Huck Gutman, and Patrick H. Hutton, Eds. History of the Human Sciences 2:1 (February 1989), 113-116.

Owen, David. Maturity and Modernity: Nietzsche, Weber, Foucault and the Ambivalence of Reason. London and New York: Routledge, 1996.

"This text examines Nietzsche, Weber and Foucault as a distinct trajectory of critical thinking within modern thought which traces the emergence and development of genealogy in the form of immanent critique. The book aims to clarify the relations between these thinkers and to respond to Habermas' (and Dews') charge that these thinkers are nihilists and that their approach is philosophically incoherent and practically irresponsible by showing how genealogy as a practical activity is directed towards the achievements of human autonomy. The scope of the book covers the critical methodologies developed by these thinkers with respect to the analysis of how we have become what we are, their substantive reconstructions of how we have become what we are and the implication which they draw for the possibility of human autonomy in the present. It proceeds by detailed analysis of each thinker in turn showing the structure of their approach, their historical account of the emergence of modernity, and the politics of their attempts to facilitate the achievement of human autonomy. This is the first book to analyze these three thinkers as a tradition of theorising and to chart the development of genealogy as a mode of critique. It provides clear accounts of the main ideas of Nietzsche, Weber and Foucault (as well as a useful glossary) and illustrates the relation between these thinkers at methodological, substantive and political levels." from the Routledge online catalog

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Owen, David, "Foucault, Habermas and the Claims of Reason." History of the Human Sciences 9:2 (1996), 119-138.

Review of G. Gutting, Ed., The Cambridge Companion to Foucault, M. Kelly, Ed., Critique and Power: Recasting the Foucault/Habermas Debate, J. Simons, Foucault and the Political, R. Visker, Michel Foucault: Genealogy as Critique, and S. K. White, Ed., The Cambridge Companion to Habermas.

Pace, David, "Structuralism in History and the Social Sciences." American Quarterly 30 (1978), 282-297.

Paden, Roger, "Surveillance and Torture: Foucault and Orwell on the Methods of Discipline." Social Theory and Practice 10 (Fall 1984), 261-271.

Palmer, Jerry, and Frank Pearce, "Legal Discourse and State Power: Foucault and the Juridical Relation." International Journal of the Sociology of Law 11 (November 1983), 361-383.

Parry-Jones, W., Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. British Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology 8 (1969), 191.

Pasquino, Pasquale, "Michel Foucault (1926-84): The Will to Knowledge." Translated by Chloe Chard. Economy and Society 15:1 (February 1986), 97-109.

Paternek, Margaret, "Norms and Normalization: Michel Foucault's Overextended Panoptic Machine." Human Studies 10:1 (1987), 97-121.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Patton, Paul, "Of Power and Prisons: Working Paper on Discipline and Punish." In Michel Foucault: Power, Truth, Strategy. Meaghan Morris and Paul Patton, Eds. Sydney, Australia: Feral Publications, 1979. "Working Papers" Collection 2. pp. 109-47.

Patton, Paul, "Taylor and Foucault on Power and Freedom." Political Studies 37 (June 1989), 260-276.

Paulson, Ronald, Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. Journal of English and Germanic Philology 67 (1968), 161-165.

Pearce, Frank, and Steve Tombs, "Foucault, Gov ernmentality, Marxism." Social and Legal Studies 7:4 (1998), 567-

Pels, Dick, "The Politics of Critical Description: Recovering the Normative Complexity of Foucault's Pouvoir/Savior." American Behavioral Scientist 38 (June/July 1995), 1018-1041.

Peters, Michael. Sociological Review 19 (1971), 634-638.

Peterson, Alan, and Robin Bunton. Foucault, Health and Medicine. London and New York, Routledge, 1997.

"The reception of Michel Foucault's work in the social sciences and humanities has been phenomenal. Foucault's concepts and methodology have encouraged new approaches to old problems and opened up new lines of enquiry. This book assesses the contribution of Foucault's work to research and thinking in the area of health and medicine, and shows how key researchers in the sociology of health and illness are currently engaging with his ideas. Foucault, Health and Medicine explores such important issues as: Foucault's concept of 'discourse', the critique of the 'medicalization' thesis, the analysis of the body and the self, Foucault's ideas for feminist research on embodiment and gendered subjectivities, the applications of Foucault's notion of governmentality to the analysis of health policy, health promotion, and the consumption of health. Foucault, Health and Medicine offers a 'state of the art' overview of Foucauldian scholarship in the area of health and medicine. It will provide a key reference for both students and researchers working in the areas of medical sociology, health policy, health promotion and feminist studies." from the Routledge on-line catalog

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Peterson, Clarence, "Wrong Side Out." Book World (21 January 1968), 17.

Brief review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault.

Pheby, Keith. Interventions: Displacing the Metaphysical Subject. Washington, DC: Maisonneuve Press, 1988. Postmodern Positions, vol. 3.

To order the hardcover edition of Interventions, go to:

Phelan, Shane, "Foucault and Feminism." American Journal of Political Science 34 (May 1990), 421-440.

Phillips, Antonia, Review of This is Not a Pipe, by Michel Foucault. Times Literary Supplement 4230 (27 April 1984), 475.

Pickett, Brent L., "Foucault and the Politics of Resistance." Polity 28 (Summer 1996), 445-466.

Pilling, John, "A Little Posthumous Prosperity: Raymond Roussel." PN Review 15:1 (1988), 43-46.

Polan, Dana, "Fables of Transgression: The Reading of Politics and the Politics of Reading in Foucaultian Discourse" boundary 2 10:3 (Spring 1982), 361-381.

Polan, Dana, "Powers of Vision, Visions of Power." 106-119.

Review of Foucault, by Gilles Deleuze.

Polan, Dana, Review of Michel Foucault, Resume de cours, 1970-1982. SubStance 19:1 (1990), 108-109.

Pollis, Carol A., "The Apparatus of Sexuality: Reflections of Foucault's Contributions to the Study of Sex in History." Journal of Sex Research 23:3 (August 1987), 401-408.

Popkewitz, Thomas S., and Marie Brennan, Eds. Foucault's Challenge: Discourse, Knowledge and Power in Education. New York: Teachers College Press, 1998.

Contents: Part I, Foucault in a Conversation with Education. 1. Thomas S. Popkewitz and Marie Brennan, "Restructuring of Social and Political Theory in Education: Foucault and a Social Epistemology of School Practices." Part II, Historical Constructions of the Reasoning of Schooling. Lynn Fendler, "What Is It Impossible to Think? A Genealogy of the Educated Subject." 3. Hanna Simola, Sakari Heikkinen, and Jussi Silvonen, "A Catalog of Possibilities: Foucaultian History of Truth and Education Research." 4. Kenneth Hultqvist, "A History of the Present on Children's Welfare in Sweden: From Frobel to Present-Day Decentralization Projects." 5. Bernadette Baker, "'Childhood' in the Emergence and Spread of U.S. Public Schools." 6. Judith Rabak Wagener, "The Construction of the Body Through Sex Education Discourse Practices." Part III, Disciplining and the Deployment of Power. 7. Bill Green, "Born-Again Teaching? Governmentality, 'Grammar,' and Public Schooling." 8. David Shutkin, "The Deployment of Information Technology in the Field of Education and the Augmentation of the Child." 9. Jennifer M. Gore, "Disciplining Bodies: On the Continuity of Power Relations in Pedagogy." Part IV, The Opening/Closing of Pedagogical Spaces. 10. David Schaafsma, "Performing the Self: Constructing Written and Curricular Fictions." 11. Mimi Orner, "School Marks: Education, Domination, and Female Subjectivity." Part V, Intellectual Work as Political. 12. Ingolfur Asgeir Johannesson, "Genealogy and Progressive Politics: Reflections on the Notion of Usefulness." 13. Lew Zipin, "Looking for Sentient Life in Discursive Practices: The Question of Human Agency in Critical Theories and School Research." 14. David Blacker, "Intellectuals at Work and in Power: Toward a Foucaultian Research Ethic."

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Porter, Dennis, "Epilogue: From Althusser's Theory of a Murder to Foucault's Aesthetics of Existance." In Rousseau's Legacy Oxford University Press, 1995. pp. 238-268.

Porter, Jame N., Review of Technolgies of the Self, Luther H. Martin, Huck Gutman, and Patrick H. Hutton, Eds. Contemporary Sociology 18 (January 1989), 153

Porter, Sam, "Contra-Foucault: Soldiers, Nurses and Power." Sociology 30 (February 1996), 59-78.

Poster, Mark, "Foucault's True Discourses." Humanities in Society 1:2 (1979), 153-166.

Poster, Mark, "The Future According to Foucault: the Archaeology of Knowledge and Intellectual History" in Dominick LaCapra and Steven Kaplan, Eds., Modern European Intellectual History: Reappraisals and New Perspectives Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1982. pp. 137-152.

Pottage, Alain, "Power as an Art of Contingency: Luhmann, Deleuze, Foucault." Economy and Society 27:1 (February 1998), 1-27.

"Abstract: This article recovers the conceptual content of Michel Foucault's model of power as 'action upon actions'. The principal argument is that the innovations of this model are intelligible only against the background of a broader social-theoretical distinction between 'substance' and 'emergence'. The suggestion is that the idea of bio-power, as distinct from sovereignty, becomes clearer, and more productive, if it is seen as a figure of emergence. More specifically, it is suggested that the logic of acting upon actions, which encapsulates so many of the vital innovations of Foucault's account of power, may be defined as a relation of 'non-indifferent difference'. In explaining these concepts, the article makes connections between Foucault's project and the work of Niklas Luhmann and Gilles Deleuze. The object of this method is to open Foucault's analyses of power to some particularly illuminating and incisive theoretical complements."

Poynter, F. N. L., Review of Naissance de la clinique, Michel Foucault. History of Science 3 (1964), 140-143.

Prado, C. G. Starting with Foucault: An Introduction to Genealogy. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1995.

"In this clear, straightforward introduction to Foucault's thought, Prado focuses on Discipline and Punish and the first volume of The History of Sexuality, in which Foucault most clearly comes to grips with the historicization of truth and knowledge and the formation of subjectivity. This sympathetic but critical introduction is especially suited for readers more familiar with Anglo-American philosophy than with Continental." from the back cover

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Pratt, John, "The Legacy of Foucualt." International Journal of the Sociology of Law 13 (August 1985), 289-293.

Review of Michel Foucault, by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain.

Privitera, Walter. Problems of Style: Michel Foucault's Epistemology. Translated by Jean Keller. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995. SUNY Series in Social and Political Thought.

"In this original reading, Privitera argues for a continuity in Foucault's work best seen when various themes and methodological strategies in his writings are traced back to the influence of Gaston Bachelard. The distinct stages in Foucault's development--from archaeology to genealogy and, finally, to the themes of subjectivization and normalization--can be viewed as different attempts to work out within the context of the human sciences insights and problems contained in Bachelard's constructivist philosopy of science. Moreover, by relating them to Bachelard's notions of philosophy and the creative spirit, Privitera is able to place in a new perspective the charge that possibility of critique. The result is a systematic, but not uncritical, interpretation of Foucault's entire corpus--including his treatment of power--in which both theory construction and emancipatory critique are primarily perceived as 'problems of style.'" from the back cover

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Pryce-Jones, Alan, Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. New York Herald Tribune (22 June 1965), 21.

Queiroz, Jean Manuel de, "Foucault: The Imaginary Sex." Journal of Homosexuality 25:1-2 (1993), 41-61.

Quinby, Lee. Freedom, Foucault, and the Subject of America. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1991.

"Drawing on Michel Foucault's theories of power, Lee Quinby examines issues of American individuality, ethics, and freedom in new and provocative ways. Through detailed critical readings of a wide range of important American texts, Quinby identifies an 'aesthetics of liberty,' an ethical tradition that presents the creation of self as an exercise of personal freedom and civic responsibility. She argues that this tradition of ethics has been and continues to be the chief means by which Americans challenge dominant modes of disciplinary power.

"Quinby explores texts ranging from Thomas Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia to June Jordan's On Call and demonstrates the ways in which they function as works of practical ethics that offer opinions and advice on how people seeking freedom ;might conduct themselves. Her discussion of Notes on the State of Virginia examines Jefferson's definition of happiness as an ethical category of beauty so vital as to justify the Revolution and guide the establishment of the new nation.

"Subsequent chapters on works by Margaret Fuller, Henry David Thoreau, James Agee and Walker Evans, Maxine Hong Kingston, and June Jordan demonstrate that an ethical aesthetics of liberty has, over the last two centuries, been the discourse of intellectuals who have continued Jefferson's resistance to dominant notions of freedom, selfhood, beauty, and ethical conduct for Americans. By reading Walden as a narrative of resistance written from the perspective of a well-educated, middle-class, white man, for example, Quinby illuminates the ways in which Thoreau challenges the societal and familial roles expected of men of similar background, including familial procreation and exclusive wage-earning responsibility. Her final chapters discuss contributions to America's aesthetics of liberty by Maxine Hong Kingston and June Jordan, who promote new forms of subjectivity that radically reject models of unified selfhood.

"The first book-length study of the literary tradition of American democratic liberty based on a framework of feminist and Foucauldian theory, Freedom, Foucault, and the Subject of American is a courageous and highly original work." from the dust jacket

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Rabinow, Paul, Ed. The Foucault Reader New York: Pantheon Books, 1985.

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Racevskis, Karlis, "The Discourse of Michel Foucault: A Case of an Absent and Forgettable Subject." Humanities in Society 3 (Winter 1980), 41-54.

Racevskis, Karlis. Michel Foucault and the Subversion of Intellect. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1983.

"Karlis Racevskis sees in Michel Foucault's explorations of history a bold and radical view of Western civilization. Focusing on Foucault's innovation approach to the analysis of discourse--its formation, its use, and its ramifications--Racevskis studies Foucault's intellectual strategy and seeks to demonstrate that his writings constitute a critique of the Western mode of thought that both delinates its foundations and challenges its hegemony.

"Racevskis highlights the subversive aspects of Foucault by placing his work in the context of French anthropological and psychoanalytic theory; by assessing the importance of his language and methods; and by contrasting his thought with more traditional philosophies. Taking a close look at Foucault's attempt to reveal the systems and mechanisms of discourse, Racevskis investigates the political implications of the relation between discourse, truth, and power." from the dust jacket

Racevskis, Karlis, "Interpreting Foucault." Papers on Language and Literature 29 (Winter 1993), 96-110.

Racevskis, Karlis, Ed. Critical Essays on Michel Foucault G. K. Hall, 1999. Critical Essays on World Literature.

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Radhakrishnan, R., "Toward an Effective Intellectual." In Intellectuals: Aesthetics, Politics, Academics. University of Minnesota Press, 1990. pp. 57-99.

Rajchman, John, "Nietzsche, Foucault and the Anarchism of Power." Semiotext(e) 3:1 (1978), 96-107.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Rajchman, John, "Foucault's Dilemma." Social Text 8 (1983-84)

Rajchman, John. Michel Foucault: The Freedom of Philosophy. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985.

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Rajchman, John, "Ethics after Foucault." Social Text 13 (1986),

Rajchman, John, "Foucault's Art of Seeing." October 44 (Spring 1988),

Rajchman, John, "Crisis." Representations 28 (Fall 1989), 90-98.

Rajchman, John. Truth and Eros: Foucault, Lacan and the Question of Ethics. London and New York: Routledge, 1991.

"The piety of moral theory has resided in its presumption to know what the Good is, and how and where to find it. In Truth and Eros John Rajchman isolates the question of ethics in the work of Foucault and Lacan and explores its ramifications and implications for the present day. He argues that in departing from the piety of moral theory, Foucault and Lacan embark on a strange uncharted voyage that takes them through Cynicism and Platonism; Antigone and Socrates; Aristotle, Kant and Bentham; Nietzsche and Freud.

"Rajchman demonstrates that the question of ethics was at once the most difficult and the most intimate question for these two authors, offering a complex point of intersection between them. As such, he argues that it belongs to that great tradition that is concerned with the passion or eros of philosophy and of its 'will to truth'

"Truth and Eros suggests a way of reading Foucault and Lacan as philosophers who re-eroticized the activity of thought in our time, opening new and different spaces for thought and action--new types of subjectivity." from the dust jacket

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Ramazanoglu, Caroline, Ed. Up Against Foucault: Explorations of Some Tensions between Foucault and Feminism. London and New York: Routledge, 1993.

"Questions of sexuality and power were central in the writings of Michel Foucault, yet Foucault largely ignored feminism. This book considers how seriously feminists should take his challenge by exploring the problems that Foucault raises for feminism, and the implications of the absence of gender in his own work." from the back cover of the paperback

Contents: Caroline Ramazanoglu, "Introduction." Part I, Reflections on the Value of Foucault's Arguments for Feminism. Kate Soper, "Productive Contradictions"; Jean Grimshaw, "Practices of Freedom"; Maureen Cain, "Foucault, Feminism and Feeling: What Foucault Can and Cannot Contribute to Feminist Epistemology." Part II: Identity, Difference and Power. M. E. Bailey, "Foucauldian Feminism: Contesting Bodies, Sexuality and Identity"; Janet Ransom, "Feminism, Difference and Discourse: The Limits of Discursive Analysis for Feminism"; Maureen McNeil, "Dancing with Foucault: Feminism and Power-Knowledge." Part III Bodies and Pleasures: Power and Resistance. Susan Bordo, "Feminism, Foucault and the Politics of the Body"; Dean MacCannell and Juliet Flower MacCannell, "Violence, Power and Pleasure: A Revisionist Reading of Foucault from the Victim Perspective"; Caroline Ramazanoglu and Janet Holland, "Women's Sexuality and Men's Appropriation of Desire."

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Rameu, Pompeu Casanovas, "Metaphor and Adlinguisticity in the Literacy Language of Michel Foucault." Law and Semiotics 2 (1988)

Ransom, John S. Foucault's Discipline: The Politics of Subjectivity. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1997.

"In Foucault's Discipline, John S. Ransom extracts a distinctive vision of the political world--and oppositional possibilities within it--from the welter of disparate topics and projects Michel Foucault pursued over his lifetime. Uniquely, Ransom presents Foucault as a political theorist in the tradition of Weber and Nietzsche, and specifically examines Foucault's work in relation to the political tradition of liberalism and the Frankfort school. By concentrating primarily on Discipline and Punish and the later Foucauldian texts, Ranson provides a fresh interpretation of this controversial philosopher's perspectives on concepts such as freedom, right, truth, and power.

"Foucault's Discipline demonstrates how Foucault's valorization of descriptive critique over prescriptive plans of action can be applied to the decisively altered political landscape of the end of this millennium. By reconstructing the philosopher's arguments concerning the significance of disciplinary institutions, biopower, subjectivity, and forms of resistence in modern society, Ransom shows how Foucault has provided a different way of looking at and responding to contemporary models of government--in short, a new depiction of the political world." from the back cover

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Ransom, John S., "Forget Vitalism: Foucault and Lebensphilosophice." Philosophy and Social Criticism 23:1 (1997), 33-

Raulet, G., Structuralism and Post-Structuralism: An Interview with Michel Foucault." Telos 55 (Spring 1983), 195-211.

Rawlinson, Mary C., "Foucault's Strategy: Knowledge, Power, and the Specificity of Truth." Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (November 1987), 371-395.

Rawson, Claude, Review of The Lives of Michel Foucault, by David Macey, Michel Foucualt, by Didier Eribon, and The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller. Sewanee Review 102 (Summer 1994), 471-476.

Ray, Larry, "Foucault, Critical Theory and the Decomposition of the Historical Subject." Philosophy and Social Criticism 14:1 (1988)

Ray, Stephen Alan. The Modern Soul: Michel Foucault and the Theological Discourse of Gordon Kaufman and David Tracy. Fortress Press, 1988. Harvard Dissertations in Religion, no. 21.

Reagan, C. E., Review of Technologies of the Self, Luther H. Martin, Huck Gutman, and Patrick H. Hutton, Eds. Choice 26 (December 1988), 661.

Reagan, C. E., Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. Choice 26 (March 1989), 1178

Reagan, C. E., Review of Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Scientific Reason, by Gary Gutting. Choice 28 (September 1990), 131.

Redekop, Fred, "The 'Problem' of Michael White and Michel Foucault." Journal of Marital and Family Therapy 21:3 (July 1995), 309-318.

Rediker, M., Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. William and Mary Quarterly 36 (1979), 637-640.

Reid, Roddey, "Foucault in America: Biography, 'Culture War,' and the New Consensus." Cultural Critique. 35 (Winter 1996-97), 179-211.

Reider, Norman, "Madness in the Age of Reason." Nation (5 July 1965), 22-23.

Review of Madness and Civilization, by Michel Foucault.

Reiser, Stanley J., Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Social Science and Medicine 10 (1976), 124.

Rella, Franco. The Myth of the Other: Lacan, Deleuze, Foucault, Bataille. Translated by Nelson Moe. Washington, DC: Maisonneuve Press, 1993. Post Modern Positions, vol. 7.

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Resch, Robert Paul, "Modernism, Post modernism, and Social Theory: A Comparison of Althusser and Foucault." Poetics Today 10:3 (Fall 1989)

Revill, David, Review of Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Scientific Reason, by Gary Gutting. Times Literary Supplement (27 July 1990), 805

Reynolds, Simon, Review of Michel Roucault, by Didier Eribon. Voice Literary Supplement 99 (October 1991), 5

Rice, D. H., Review of Michel Foucault and the Politics of Freedom, by Thomas L. Dumm. Choice 33 (July/August 1996), 1869.

Richlin, A., "Zeus and Metis, Foucault, Feminism, Classics." Helos 18:2 (Fall 1991), 160-180.

Richters, Annemiek, "Modernity-Postmodernity Controversies: Habermas and Foucault." Theory, Culture & Society. 5 (1988), 611-643.

Riddel, Joseph N., "Re-Doubling the Commentary." Contemporary Literature 20 (1979), 237-250.

Rieff, Philip, Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. Annals of the American Academy 371 (1967), 258-259.

Riker, J. H., Review of The Question of Ethics, by Charles E. Scott. Choice 28 (April 1991), 1328.

Riley, Philip F., "Michel Foucault, Lust, Women, and Sin in Louis XIV's Paris." Church History 59:1 (April 1990)

Robinson, Keith, "The Foucault/Deleuze Conjuction." Philosophy Today 43:1 (Spring 1999), 57-

Rorty, Richard, "Foucault/Dewey/Nietzsche" Raritan 9:4 (Spring 1990), 1-8.

Rorty, Richard, "Moral Identity and Private Autonomy: The Case of Foucault." In Essays on Heidegger and Others. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991. pp. 193-198.

Rorty, Richard, "Paroxysms and Politics." Salmagundi 97 (Winter 1993), 61-68.

Rose, Marilyn Gaddis, Review of Technologies of the Self, Luther H. Martin, Huck Gutman, and Patrick H. Hutton, Eds. Library Journal 112 (15 November 1987), 83.

Rose, Nikolas S. Powers of Freedom: Reframing Political Thought Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

"This book presents an impressive synthesis of an important and influential school of thought, derived from Foucault's writings on governmentality, which extends into new and challenging domains. Nikolas Rose ranges across the many field on which governmentality theory has been brought to bear, including expertise, culture and government, economic management, psychology, and community. Unusually, he suggests that fredom is not the opposite of government but one of its key inventons and most significant resources. His book will serve as an intelligent introducotn to governmentality for students and scholars alike." from the Cambridge online catalog

Contents: Introduction: Reframing Political Thought. 1. Governing. 2. Freedom. 3. The Social. 4. Advanced Liberalism. 5. Community. 6. Numbers. 7. Control. Conclusion: Beyond Government.

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Rosemann, Philipp W. The Scholastic Episteme: Understanding Medieval Thought with Foucault New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999. The New Middle Ages.

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Roth, M. J., "Foucault's History of the Present." History and Theory 20:1 (1981), 32-46.

Roth, Michael S., Review of Michel Foucault, by John Rajchman. History and Theory 27:1 (1988), 70-80.

Roth, Michael S., Review of Michel Foucault, Politics, Philosophy, Culture: Interviews and Other Writings, 1977-1984. American Historical Review 95:3 (June 1990), 776-777.

Roth, Michael, "Reinscribing Michel Foucault." Intellectual History Newsletter 15 (1993), 57-61.

Rothman, David, "Society and Its Prisons." New York Times Book Review (19 February 1978), 1.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Rothstein, Eric, "Foucault, Discursive History, and the Auto-Affection of God." Modern Language Quarterly 55 (December 1994), 383-414.

Rothwell, Kenneth S., Review of Michel Foucault, by Charles C. Lemert and Garth Gillan, and Michel Foucault and the Subversion of Intellect, by Karlis Racevskis. Clio 13 (Winter 1984), 171-173.

Rouse, Joseph, "Beyond Epistemic Sovereignty." In The Disunity of Science Stanford University Press, 1996. pp. 398-416.

Rousseau, G. S. , Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. Eighteenth-Century Studies 4 (1970), 90-95.

Rousseau, G. S., "Whose Enlightenment? Not Man's: The Case of Michel Foucault." Eighteenth-Century Studies 6:2 (Winter 1972-73), 238-256.

Review of The Order of Things, by Michel Foucault.

Rousseau, G. S., Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. Philological Quarterly (Fall 1975), 790.

Rubenstein, Diane, "Indiscreet Jewels: Can We Talk about The Passion of Michel Foucault?" Modern Fiction Studies 41 (Fall/Winter 1995), 681-698.

Review of The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller.

Ryan, Alan, "Foucault's Life and Hard Times." New York Review of Books 40 (8 April 1993), 12-17.

Said, Edward, "Abecedarium Culturae: Structuralism, Absence, Writing." Tri-Quarterly 20 (1971), 33-71.

Said, Edward, "Linguistics and the Archaeology of the Mind." International Philosophical Quarterly 11 (1971), 103-134.

Said, Edward, "Michel Foucault as an Intellectual Imagination." Boundary 2 1 (1972), 1-36.

Discusses The Archaeology of Knowledge.

Said, Edward, "An Ethics of Language." diacritics 4:2 (1974), 28-37.

Discusses The Archaeology of Knowledge.

Said, Edward, "The Problem of Textuality: Two Exemplary Positions." Critical Inquiry 4 (1978), 673-714.

Said, Edward W., "Travelling Theory." Raritan 1:3 (1982), 41-67.

Said, Edward W., "French Philosopher Michel Foucault: Death at an Early Age." In These Times (September 5-11, 1984), 18-19, 22.

Sangren, P. Steven, "'Power' Against Ideology: A Critique of Foucaultian Usage." Cultural Anthropology 10 (February 1995), 3-40.

Sargent, M., Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. New England Journal of Prison Law 5 (1979), 235-240.

Sawicki, Jana, "Foucault and Feminism: Toward a Politics of Difference." Hypatia 1:2 (1986), 23-

Sawicki, Jana, "Heidegger and Foucault: Escaping Technological Nihilism." Philosophy and Social Criticism 13:2 (1987)

Sawicki, Jana. Disciplining Foucault: Feminism, Power and the Body. London and New York: Routledge, 1991. Thinking Gender series.

"In Disciplining Foucault, Jana Sawicki argues that a Foucauldian feminism is possible. She rejects the view that the power of phallocentric discourse is total. Instead, like Foucault, she sees discourse as ambiguous and plurivocal, a site of conflict and contestation. Women can adapt language to their own ends. They may not have total control over it but neither do men.

"Emphasizing Foucault's later works Sawicki fleshes out his undeveloped remarks about resistance in order to show how his discourse can be used to support specific liberatory struggles, namely those for sexual and reproductive freedom.

"Sawicki presents what she believes to be the truly radical dimensions of Foucault's thought so that they can be scrutinized by a feminist audience. The essays reflect her effort to think feminism through Foucault, and where necessary to think beyond him." from the back cover

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Sax, Benjamin, "Foucault, Nietzsche, History: Two Modes of Genealogical Method." History of European Ideas 11 (1989), 769-781.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Schuab, Uta, "Foucault, Alternative Presses and Alternative Ideology in West Germany: A Report." German Studies Review 12:1 (1989)

Schaub, Uta Liebmann, "Foucault's Oriental Subtext." PMLA 104 (May 1989), 306-316.

Schehr, Lawrence R., "Introduction: From Gide to Foucault." In The Shock of Men: Homosexual Hermeneutics in French Writing. Stanford University Press, 1995. pp. 1-32.

Schor, Naomi, "Dreaming Dissymmetry: Barthes, Foucault, and Sexual Difference." In Bad Objects Duke University Press, 1995. pp. 31-43.

Schrift, A. D., Review of Foucault, by Gilles Deleuze. Choice 26 (October 1988), 329

Schubert, J. Daniel, "From a Politics of Transgression Toward an Ethics of Reflexivity: Foucault, Bourdieu, and Academic Practice." American Behavioral Scientist 38 (June/July 1995), 1003-1017.

Schurmann, Reiner, "'What Can I Do?' in an Archaeological-Genealogical History." Journal of Philosophy 82 (October 1985), 540-548.

Schwartz, Michael, "Critical Reproblemization: Foucault and the Task of Modern Philosophy" Radical Philosophy 91 (1998), 19-

Scott, Charles E., "Foucault's Practice of Thinking." Research in Phenomenology 14 (1984), 75-85.

Scott, Charles E., "The Power of Medicine, the Power of Ethics." Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (November 1987), 335-356.

Scott, Charles E. The Question of Ethics: Nietzsche, Foucault, Heidegger. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Studies in Continental Thought.

Scott, Charles E., "Foucault, Ethics, and the Fragmented Subject." Research in Phenomenology 22 (1992), 104-137.

Scrutton, Roger, "On Madness and Method." Spectator (9 October 1971), 513.

Review of Madness and Civilization, by Michel Foucault.

Seals, Greg, "Objectivity Yours, Michel Foucault." Educational Theory , 48:1 (Winter 1998), 59-

Seem, Mark, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Telos 29 (1976), 245-254.

Segal, Robert A., Review of The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller. Religion 24 (October 1994), 396-397.

Seigel, Jerrold, "Avoiding the Subject: A Foucaultian Itinerary." Journal of the History of Ideas 51 (April/June 1990), 273-299.

Seltzer, Mark, "Reading Foucault: Cells, Corridors, Novels." diacritics 14:1 (Spring 1984), 78-89.

Review of Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow, Michel Foucault and Karlis Racevskis, Michel Foucault and the Subversion of Intellect.

Shaffer, Elinor S., "The Archaeology of Michel Foucault." Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 7:3 (1976), 269-275.

Discusses The Archaeology of Knowledge.

Shaffer, Elinor, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Signs 5 (1980), 812-820.

Shapiro, Gary, "Translating, Repeating, Naming: Foucault, Derrida, and The Genealogy of Morals." In Nietzsche as Postmodernist. State University of New York Press, 1990. pp. 39-55.

Shapiro, Michael J., "Michel Foucault and the Analysis of Discursive Practice." In Language and Political Understanding: The Politics of Discursive Practices. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1981. pp. 127-164.

Sharratt, Bernard, "Notes after Foucault." New Blackfriars 53:625 (June 1972), 251-264.

Shattuck, Roger, "Second Thoughts on a Wooden Horse." Salmagundi 106/107 (Spring/Summer 1995), 23-30.

Shelley, L. Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. American Journal of Sociology 84 (1979), 1508-1510.

Sheperdson, Charles, "A Loss for Words: Literature and Method in The Order of Things Literature and Psychology 40:4 (1994), 1-27.

Shepherdson, Charles, Review of Michel Foucault, Philosopher, Timothy J. Armstrong, Ed. Ethics 103 (January 1993), 430.

Sheridan, Alan. Michel Foucault: The Will to Truth. London and New York: Tavistock Publications / Metheun, 1980.

Reprinted by Routledge in 1990, 1994.

"Michel Foucault: The Will to Truth is the first full-length study of Foucault in any language. It covers the whole of his work to date, including material unavailable in English, and Provides invaluable information on recent French intellectual history. Foucault emerges as an essential thinker for out time: his 'political anatomy' implies a radical critique not only of established intellectual positions, and social instiutions, but also of most of the alternatives offered by the pooositin." from the back cover of the 1994 Routledge reprint.

Contents: Introdution. Part I: The Archaeology of Knowledge. 1. Madness, Death, and the Birth of Reason. 2. The World, Representation, Man. 3. The Archaeological Theory of Knowledge. Part IIL: The Geneaology of Power. 1. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge. 2. Society, Power, and Knowledge. 3. Sexuality, Power, and Knowledge. Conclusion.

To order the paperback edition of Michel Foucault: The Will to Truth, go to:

Sheridan, Alan. Michel Foucault: A Life in the Present. New York: Routledge

Shiner, Larry, "Reading Foucault: Anti-Method and the Genealogy of Power-Knowledge." History and Theory 21:3 (1982), 382-397.

Shiveley, Death and the Labyrinth: The World of Raymond Roussel, Michel Foucault. Gay Community News 14 (10 May 1987), 5.

Shumway, David R. Michel Foucault. Boston: Twayne Publications, 1989. Twayne's World Authors Series: French Literature, TWAS 184.

Paperback reprint edition: Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1992.

"A principle architect of poststrucuralism, Michel Foucault (1926-1984) reshaped the varied disciplines of history, philosophy, literary theory, and social science with his seminal works Histoire de la folie a l'age classique (Madness and Civilization in its abbreviated form), The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, The Archeology of Knowledge, Discipline and Punish and the multivolume History of Sexuality, left incomplete at his death. With fellow theorists Jacques Lacan, Roland Barthes, and Jacques Derrida, Foucault repeatedly challenged our assumptions, beliefs, and expectations, reinventing discourse to liberate new concepts and new thoughts.

"Working closely with the texts, and assuming that the reader has no prior knowledge of poststructuralist theory or ternminology, David R. Shumway presents a clear and riveting picture of Foucault. He traces the development of Foucault's thought, focusing on his subversion of (and relation to) the 'author-function,' diagramming Foucault's discursive strategies and examing his incessant struggle to reconceive knowledge and rewrite history. Distinguishing the elements in Foucault's works that have the potential to remake social and political structures, Shumway analyzes the central question raised by Foucault's works: the relation between power and knowledge. Introducing all of Foucault's works, including his groundbreaking essays, "What Is an Author?" and "The Discourse of Language," Michel Foucault provides a means of entry into the distinctive, thought-provoking world of poststructuralism." from the dust jacket of the Twayne edition


"This is the best overview of Foucault's work to date. A principal architect of poststructuralism, Michel Foucault reshaped the varied disciplines of history, philosophy, literary theory, and social science. With fellow theorists Jacques Lacan, Roland Barthes, and Jacques Derrida, Foucault repeatedly challenged our assumptions, beliefs, and expectations, reinventing discourse to liberate new concepts and new thoughts. His work is set apart from theirs, however, by its attention to, and reconceptualization of, history.

"David Shumway has provided, for the nonspecialist, a systematic analysis of the works of Foucault that is both thorough and accessible. Drawing on examples from a wide range of disciplines and materials, he illustrated those things in Foucault's work that tend to be stumbling blocks, yet avoids oversimplification. Shumway connects Fouault's various conceptual and linguistic techniques to the basic critical strategies and purpose of his philosophy. The book is organized to reflect both the evolution of Foucault's thought and the continuity in his philosophical and ethical concerns." from the back cover of the University of Virginia Press paperback

Contents: 1. Foucault as an Author. 2. Foucault's Strategies. 3. Madness and the Gaze. 4. The Episteme and the Disappearance of Man. 5. Archaeology and Genealogy. 6. Disciplinary Technologies and theConstitution of Individuals. 7. Sexuality and the Will to Knowledge. 8. Conclusion: Four or Five Things to Do with Foucault.

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Shusterman, Richard, "The Self As a Work of Art." Nation (30 June 1997), 25-28.

Review of The Essential Works of Michel Foucault, 1954-1984. Vol. 1, Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth., Paul Rabinow, Ed.

Silver, Daniel J., Review of The Lives of Michel Foucault, by David Macey. American Scholar 64 (Winter 1995), 124-.

Silverman, David, Review of Michel Foucault, by John Rajchman, and Michel Foucault, by Barry Smart. Sociology 20 (August 1986), 487-488.

Silverman, Hugh S., "Jean-Paul Sartre versus Michel Foucault on Civilizational Study." Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (1978), 161-171.

Silverman, Hugh S., "Michel Foucault's Nineteenth Century System of Thought and the Anthropological Sleep." Seminar 3 (1979), 1-8.

Simon, John, Review of Folie et deraison, Michel Foucault. Modern Language Notes 78 (1963), 85-88.

Simon, John, "Interview with Michel Foucault." Partisan Review 38 (1971), 192-200.

Simons, Jonathan. Foucault and the Political. London: Routledge, 1994. Thinking the Political.

"This is the first study of Michel Foucault's political thought to be published in a single volume. Jon Simons explores Foucault's politics and ideas about the political across the whole body of his writing, including his most recently published work. Foucault's impassioned critique of the limitations of contemporary society and his affirmation of new forms of subjectivity have made his work vital to many areas of important new political thinking; thinking often taking place outside of conventional political categories. Simons places Foucault's work in the context of contemporary political theory -- including that of Michael Walzer, Charles Taylor and Jurgen Habermas -- and in relation to the rise of alternative models for politics -- such as those found in the work of William Connolly and Judith Butler. The political ramifications of Foucault's thought and the question of his personal politics have recently shaken up the way in which his work is understood. His concern with limits, as both constraining and enabling emerges -- the possibility of transgression both as a theoretical and personal project is seen by Simons to be ever present for Foucault, both in his work and his life. Simons has include concise explanations of key concepts in Foucault's work such as power/knowledge, subjectification, aesthetics of existence, and political rationality to help readers new to Foucault's thought. Foucault and the political will appeal to both the student and the more advance reader in philosophy and politics, whether they are interested in Foucault or contemporary political thought." from the Routledge online catalog

To order the hardcover edition of Foucault and the Political, go to:
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Singer, R., Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Crime and Delinquency 25 (1979), 376-379.

Skeats, Terry, Review of The Question of Ethics, by Charles E. Scott. Library Journal 115 (15 September 1990), 80.

Slattery, David. The End of the Anthropological Self: Foucault in the Trobriand Islands. Poznan: UAM, 1993. Seria Etnologia i antropoligia kulturowa, nr. 17.

Smart, Barry. Foucault, Marxism and Critique. London and New York: Routledge, 1983.

"Despite the great social, political, cultural and economic changes that have taken place in the twentieth century, social scientists continue to make sense of the present in terms which are deeply rooted in nineteenth-century thought. This is particularly true in the case of critical forms of analysis and theory, which have continued to be articulated principally in Marxist terms.

"Nevertheless, it has become increasingly apparent that there are both limits and limitations to Marxist analysis. It is in the context of a discussion of the critical problems of Marxism and associated debates and responses that this study presents a commentary on the work of Foucault, and considers its relation to Marxist analysis.

"Barry Smart examines the relevance of Foucault's work for developing an understanding of those issues which lie beyond the limits of Marxists theory and analysis--issues such as 'individualising' forms of power, power-knowledge relatioins, the rise of 'the social', and the associated socialisation of politics. He argues that there are clear and substantial differences between Foucault's genealogical analysis (derived from Nietzsche's conception of genealogy) and Marxist theory and analysis is the activity of critique rather than the provision of programmes, prophecies or policies. In consequence, Smart presents Foucault's work as a new form of critical theory, whose object is a critical analysis of rationalities, and of how relations of power are rationalised." from the back cover

Smart, Barry, Review of Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. Sociology 18 (August 1984), 445-446.

Smart, Barry. Michel Foucault. London and New York: Routledge, 1985. Key Sociologists series.

"The book considers the themes and issues in Foucault's major works, outlining their breadth and diversity, and revealing the presence of particular developing themes and conceptual continuities, as well as discontinuities." from the Routledge on-line catalog

Smart, Barry, "On the Subjects of Sexuality, Ethics, and Politics in the Work of Foucault." boundary 2 18:1 (Spring 1991), 201-225.

Smart, Barry, Ed. Michel Foucault I. Critical Assessments: Archaeology, Genealogy and Politics. London and New York: Routledge, 1994. Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists series. 3 vols.

"Without doubt Michel Foucault was one of the towering intellectual presences of the twentieth century. His work on the organization of knowlege, sexuality, power, discipline, medicine, madness, identity and politics has left an indelible mark on our understanding of these matters. In recognition of Foucault's achievement Routledge has commissioned two three volumed Critical Assessments as the benchmark guides to his thought. The first set, Michel Foucault I discusses the work of Michel Foucault on questions of method and politics, and the second set, Michel Foucault II will examine Foucault's work in relation to the themes of rationality, power and subjectivity."

"Michel Foucault I: Archaeology, Genealogy and Politics is divided into four sections concerned with 'Situating Foucault', 'Archaeology-Discourse, Language, Literature', 'Genealogy, History and Critique', 'Politics, Ethics and Truth'. Edited by one of the world's most distinguished Foucault scholars, both collections include general and section introductions by Barry Smart to set Foucault's work in the appropriate historical and intellectual context, and to guide the reader through the complexities of the papers." from the Routledge on-line catalog

To order the hardcover edition of Michel Foucault: Critical Assessments (Vols. 1-3), go to:
To order the hardcover edition of Michel Foucault: Critical Assessments (Vols. 1-7), go to:

Smart, Barry, Ed. Michel Foucault II. Critical Assessments: Rationality, Power and Subjectivity. London and New York: Routledge, 1995. Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists. 3 vols.

"Without doubt, Michel Foucault was one of the towering intellectual presences of the twentieth century, and his legacy is still very much in the making. However, as the different contributions in these three volumes demonstrate, Foucault's work has already had significant impact on a wide range of intellectual endeavor, and no doubt his influence will continue to grow. His work on the organization of knowledge, sexuality, power, discipline, medicine, madness, identity and politics has left an indelible mark on our understanding of these matters. In recognition of Foucault's achievement Routledge have commissioned a second Critical Assessment. ...The second [set] examines Foucault's work in relation to the themes of rationality, power and subjectivity. ... Michel Foucault II is divided into five sections: History of Forms of Rationality, Relations of Power and Knowledge, Sexuality and Subjectivity, Foucault as Catalyst, Final Reflections." from the Routledge on-line catalog

To order the hardcover edition of Michel Foucault: Critical Assessments (Vols. 4-7), go to:
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Smith, Adam T., "Fictions of Emergence: Foucault/Genealogy/Nietzsche." Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (March 1994), 41-54.

Smith, Dennis, "The Civilizing Process and The History of Sexuality: Comparing Norbert Elias and Michel Foucault." Theory and Society 28:1 (February 1999), 79-

Sommer, R., Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Civil Liberties Review 5 (1978), 66-69.

Soper, Kate, "Ruling Passion Strong in Death." Radical Philosophy 66 (Spring 1994), 44-46.

Review of the Foucault biographies by Eribon, Macey and Miller.

Spargo, Tamsin Foucault and Queer Theory Cambridge: Icon, 1999. New York: Totem, 1999. Postmodern Encounters.

"Michel Foucault is the most gossiped-about celebrity of French poststructuralist theory. The homophobic inslult 'queer' is now proudly reclaimed by some who once called themselves lesbian or gay. What is the connections between the two?

"This is a postmodern encounter between Foucault's theories of sexuality, power and discourse and the current key exponents of queer thinking who have adopted, revised and criticised Foucault. Our understanding of gender, identity, sexaulity and cultural politics will be radically altered in this meeting of transgressive figures.

"Foucault and Queer Theory excels as a brief introduction to Foucault's compelling ideas and the development of queer culture with its own outspoken views of heteronormativity, sado-mascochism, performativity, transgender, the end of gender, liberation-versus-difference, late capitalism and the mpact of AIDS on theories and practices." from the back cover

Spellmeyer, Kurt, "Foucault and the Freshman Writer." College English 51:7 (November 1989)

Spicker, Stuart F., "An Introduction to the Medical Epistemology of Georges Canguilhem: Moving Beyond Michel Foucault." Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (November 1987), 397-411.

Sprinker, Michael, "The Use and Abuse of Foucault." Humanities in Society 3 (Winter 1980), 1-22.

Sprinker, Michael, "The Power of the Text: Foucault versus Derrida." Boundary 2 ?

Sprinker, Michael, Review of Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow, Michel Foucault, by Charles C. Lemert and Garth Gillian, and Michel Foucault and the Subversion of Intellect, by Karlis Racevskis. Criticism 26 (Fall 1984), 383-387.

Squires, Judith, Ed. Michel Foucault: J'Accuse Theme issue of New Formations 25 (Summer 1995).

"Based on the highly successful conference held in London in 1994 to mark the tenth anniversary of Michel Foucault's death, the articles in this issue of New Formations testify to the continuing impact of Foucault's ideas on contemporary theorising.

"However, the contributors to this collection all resist the tendancy to commemorate and revere Foucault in favour of a more dissonant and experiment use of his thought to pursue varied agendas of current concern.

"Foucault's acclaimed biographers, James Miller and David Macey, each reflect on the legacy of Foucault's life and work, whilst leading theorists from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds use Foucauldian themes and images to explore current theoretical and political issues."

Includes: David Macey, "Michel Foucault: J'Accuse; John Rajchman, "Foucault Ten Years After"; Kate Soper, "Forget Foucault?"; Alan D. Schrift, "Reconfiguring the Subject as a Process of Self: Following Foucault's Nietzschean Trajectory to Butler, Laclau/Mouffe, and Beyond"; Sue Golding, "The Politics of Foucault's Poetics, or, Better Yet: the Ethical Demand of Ecstatic Flesh"; James Miller, "From Socrates to Foucault: The Problem of the Philosophical Life"; Robert J. C. Young, "Foucault on Race and Colonialism"; John Marks, "A New Image of Thought"; Wendy Wheeler, "After Grief: What Kinds of Inhuman Selves?"

To order this special issue of New Formations, go to:

Stack, G. J., Review of Michel Foucault, Philosopher, Timothy J. Armstrong, Ed. Choice 30 (October 1992), 315.

Stack, G. J., Review of Foucault's Nietzschean Genealogy, by Michael Mahon. Choice 30 (May 1993), 1480.

Starobinsky, Jean, Review of Birth of the Clinic, Michel Foucault. New York Review of Books (22 January 1976), 18-22.

Stauth, Georg. Revolution is Spiritless Times: An Essay on the Inquiries of Michel Foucault on the Iranian Revolution. Republic of Singapore: Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore, 1991. Working Papers, no. 103.

Stempel, Daniel, "Blake, Foucault, and the Classical Episteme." PMLA 96 (1981), 388-407.

Stewart, D., "Why Foucault." Architecture and Urbanism 121 (1980), 100-106.

Still, Arthur, and Irving Velody, Eds. Rewriting the History of Madness: Studies in Foucault's Historie de la Folie. London and New York: Routlege, 1992.

Still, Judith, "'What Foucault Fails to Acknowledge ...': Feminists and The History of Sexuality. History of the Human Sciences 7 (May 1994), 150-157.

Stoler, Ann Laura. Race and the Education of Desire: Foucault's History of Sexuality and the Colonial Order of Things. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1995.

To order the hardcover edition of Race and the Education of Desire, go to:
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Stratton, Jon. Writing Sites: A Genealogy of the Postmodern World Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 1990.

To order the hardcover edition of Writing Sites, go to:

Strenski, Ivan, "Religion, Power , and Final Foucault." Journal of the American Academy of Religion 66:2 (Summer 1998), 345-

Strong, Beret E., "Foucault, Freud, and French Feminism: Theorizing Hysteria as Theorizing the Feminine." Literature and Psychology 35:4 (1989), 10-26.

Sturm, Ernest, Review of The Passion of Michel Foucault, by Jim Miller. French Review 69 (April 1996), 829-830.

Sullivan, Mark, "Michel Foucault and the Truth of Madness." Review of Existential Psychology and Psychiatry 21:1-3 (1988)

Sullivan, Robert R., "The Birth of the Prison: Discipline or Punish?" Journal of Criminal Justice 24:5 (1996), 449-458.

Surkis, Judith, "No Fun and Games Until Someone Loses an Eye: Transgression and Masculinity in Bataille and Foucault." diacritics 26 (Summer 1996), 18-30.

Swingewood, Alan, Review of Michel Foucault, Charles C. Lemert and Garth Gillan. British Journal of Sociology 35 (June 1984), 305-306.

Swingewood, Alan, Review of Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, by Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. British Journal of Sociology 36 (March 1985), 144-145.

Swingewood, Alan, Review of Michel Foucault, by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain. British Journal of Sociology 36 (December 1985), 640.

Swingewood, Alan, Michel Foucault, by Barry Smart. British Journal of Sociology 38 (June 1987), 294.

Szakolczai, Arpad, "Thinking Beyond the East-West Divide: Foucault, Patocka, and the Care of the Self." Social Research 61 (Summer 1994), 297-323.

Szakolczai, Arpad, "Reappraising Foucault." American Journal of Sociology 103:5 (March 1998), 1402-

Szakolczai, Arpad. Max Weber and Michel Foucault: Parallel Life-Works. London and New York: Routledge, forthcoming [publication date originally announced as May 1998]. Routledge Studies in Social and Political Thought, 8.

To order the hardcover edition of Max Weber and Michel Foucault, go to:

Tadros, Victor, "Between Governance and Discipline: The Law and Michel Foucault." Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18:1 (Spring 1998), 75-

Tarbet, David, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. Eighteenth-Century Studies 11 (1978), 509-514.

Taylor, Charles, "Foucault on Freedom and Truth" in Charles Taylor, Philosophy and the Human Sciences Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985. pp. 152-184.

Taylor, Charles, " ." Political Theory 13 (August 1985), 265-285.

A rejoinder to William E. Connolly's rebuttal to Taylor's critique of Foucault.

Tejera, V., "The Human Sciences in Dewey, Foucault and Buchler." Southern Journal of Philosophy 18 (1980), 221-235.

Tennessen, Carol, "Nothing but the Truth: The Case of Pierre Riviere." University of Toronto Quarterly 57 (Winter 1987/88), 290-305.

Tester, Keith, Review of Politics, Philosophy, Culture, by Michel Foucault. Sociology 25 (February 1991), 158-159.

Thacker, Andrew, "Foucault's Aesthetics of Existence." Radical Philosophy 63 (Spring 1993), 13-21.

Thiele, Leslie P., "Foucault's Triple Murder and the Modern Development of Power." Canadian Journal of Political Science 19 (June 1986), 243-260.

Thiele, Leslie P., "The Agony of Politics: The Nietzschean Roots of Foucault's Thought." American Political Science Review 84 (September 1990), 907-925.

Thody, Philip, Review of Michel Foucault, by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain. Journal of European Studies 15 (December 1985), 307-308.

Tjiattas, Mary, and Jean-Pierre Delaporte, "Foucault's Nominalism of the Sexual." Philosophy Today 32 (Summer 1988), 118-127.

Tremblay, Daniel, Review of Michel Foucault Philosophe Canadian Journal of Political Science 23 (December 1990), 832-833.

Tribe, Keith, Review of Michel Foucault, by Mark Cousins and Athar Hussain. Man 21 (March 1986), 163-164.

Valencia-Villa, H., "Foucault and the Law: An Antijuridical Jurisprudence?" Phillipine Law Journal 56 (1981)

Valero-Silva, Nestor, "A Foucauldian Reflection on Critical Systems Thinking." In Critical Systems Thinking: Current Research and Practice Robert L. Flood and Norma R. A. Romm, Eds. New York: Plenum Press, 1996.

Venn, Couze, "Beyond Enlightenment? After the Subject of Foucault." Theory, Culture and Society 14:3 (August 1997), 1-

Veyne, Paul. "The Final Foucault and His Ethics." Translated by Catherine Porter and Arnold I. Davidson. Critical Inquiry 20 (Autumn 1993), 1-9.

Vicinus, M., Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Feminist Studies 8 (Spring 1982), 133-156.

Vine, Richard, "The History of an Illusion." Georgia Review 33 (1979), 918-922.

Visker, Rudi. Michel Foucault: Genealogy as Critique. Translated from the Dutch edition (1990) by Chris Turner . London and New York: Verso, 1995.

"The reception of Michel Foucault's work has often been divided between two unsatisfactory alternatives. On the one hand there are those who admire the detail of his concrete analyses, but wonder how the political and ethical commitments they seem to rely on can be justified. On the other, there are those who deny the need for normative foundations, but also find it difficult to explain what makes Foucault's archaeologies and genealogies critical. Rudi Visker's book is not only a lucid and elegant survey of Foucault's corpus, from his early work on madness to the History of Sexuality, but also a major intervention in this debate.

"Reading Foucault against the Heideggerian backdrop to this work, Visker shows that Foucault's target is not order as such, but rather the production of ordering systems which cannot acknowledge their own conditions of possibility. Exploring along the way such intriguing issues as the ambivalence of Foucault's concepts of truth and power, and his philosophically provocative use of quotation marks. Visker portays Foucault as neither relativist nor positivist, neither activist nor detached observer. Instead, Foucault emerges as the inventor of a new analysis of our modern mechanisms of control and exclusion: precisely of 'genealogy as critique.'" from the back cover

To order the hardcover edition of Michel Foucault: Genealogy As Critique, go to:
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Visker, Rudi, "From Foucault to Heidegger: A One-way Ticket?" Research in Phenomenology 21 (1991), 116-140.

Visker, Rudi, "Habermas on Heidegger and Foucault: Meaning and Validity in The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity. Radical Philosophy 61 (Summer 1992), 15-22.

Wain, Kenneth, "Foucault, Education, the Self and Modernity." Journal of Philosophy of Education 30:3 (1996), 345-

Wallbank, Julie, "An Unlikely Match? Foucault and the Lone Mother." Law and Critique 9:1 (Spring 1998), 59-

Walzer, Michael, "The Politics of Michel Foucault." Dissent 30 (Fall 1983), 481-490.

Wapner, Paul, "What's Left: Marx, Foucault and Contemporary Problems of Social Change." Praxis International 9:1-2 (1989)

Warren, Neil, Review of The Archaeology of Knowledge, Michel Foucault. Social Science and Medicine 7 (1973), 400-402.

Watson, Stephen, "Merleau-Ponty and Foucault: De-aestheticization of the Work of Art." Philosophy Today 28 (Summer 1984), 148-166.

Weeks, Jeffrey, "Foucault for Historians." History Workshop Journal 14 (Autumn 1982), 106-119.

Weightman, John, "On Not Understanding Michel Foucault." American Scholar 58:3 (Summer 1989), 383-406.

Weiss, Harold, "The Genealogy of Justice and the Justice of Genealogy: Chomsky and Said vs. Foucault and Bove." Philosophy Today 33 (Spring 1989), 73-94.

White, Edmund, "An Emperor of the Mind." Vogue 174 (November 1984), 332, 334, 336.

White, Edmund, "The Politics of Gender: Michel Foucault." In The Burning Library: Essays. Knopf, 1994. pp. 89-94.

White, Hayden, "Foucault Decoded: Notes from Underground." History and Theory 12 (1973), 23-54.

White, Hayden, "The Archaeology of Sex." Times Literary Supplement (6 May 1977), 565.

Discusses The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction.

White, Hayden, Review of Discipline and Punishment, Michel Foucault. American Historical Review 11 (1978), 605-606.

White, Hayden, "Michel Foucault." In Structuralism and Since: From Levi-Strauss to Derrida. John Sturrock, Ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979. pp. 81-115.

White, Hayden, "Power and the Word." Canto 2 (Spring 1978), 164-172.

White Stephen K., "Foucault's Challenge to Critical Theory." American Political Science Review 80 (June 1986), 419-432.

Wickham, Gary, "Power and Power Analysis: Beyond Foucault?" Economy and Society 12:4 (November 1983), 468-498.

Wilder, W. D., Review of Madness and Civilization, Michel Foucault. Man 7 (1972), 184-185.

Williams, James S., Review of Michel Foucault et ses contemporains, by Didier Eribon. French Review 70 (March 1997), 604-605.

Williams, Karel, "Unproblematic Archaeology." Economy and Society 3 (1974), 41-68.

Review of The Archaeology of Knowlege, by Michel Foucault.

Wilson, Emmett, Jr., Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 30:3 (1982), 797-799.

Wilson, Timothy H., "Foucault, Genealogy, History." Philosophy Today 39 (Summer 1995), 157-170.

Winnubst, Shannon, "Exceeding Hegel and Lacan: Different Fields of Pleasure within Foucault and Irigary." Hypatia 14:1 (Winter 1999), 13-

Wolfenstein, Eugene Victor, "Michel Foucault and Psycoanalytic-Marxism." South Atlantic Quarterly , 97:2 (Spring 1998), 361-

Wolff, Janet, Review of This is Not a Pipe, by Michel Foucault. British Journal of Aesthetics 24 (Autumn 1984), 368-370.

Wolin, Richard, "Foucault's Aesthetic Decisionism" Telos 67 (1986), 71-86.

Wolin, Richard, "Michel Foucault and the Search for the Other of Reason." In The Terms of Cultural Criticism: The Frankfort School, Existentialism, Poststrucuralism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992. pp. 170-193.

Wolin, Richard, Review of The Passion of Michel Foucault, by James Miller. Dissent 40 (Spring 1993), 259-263.

Woodward, Kenneth L., "A Philosopher's Death Wish." Newsweek 121 (1 February 1993), 63.

Wright, Gordon, "Foucault in Prison." Stanford French Review 1 (Spring 1977), 71-78.

Discusses Discipline and Punishment.

Yun, P'yong-jung. Rationality and Social Criticism: Habermas, Foucault, and Beyond. Chuncheon, Korea: Kangweon National University Press, 1989.

Zeldin, Theodore, "An Archaeologist of Knowledge." New Statesman (7 December 1973), 861-862.

Review of Birth of the Clinic, by Michel Foucault.

Zinner, Jacqueline, Review of The History of Sexuality, Volume I: An Introduction, Michel Foucault. Telos 36 (1978), 215-225.


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